preexisting condition

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preexisting condition

[prē′iksis′ting]
Etymology: L, prae + existere, to have reality, conditio
any injury, disease, or disability that may have occurred at some time in the past and may predispose an individual to limited health in the future.

preexisting condition

Health insurance An injury, illness or medical condition–eg, cancer, DM, HTN, mental disorder that a person had before a (new) health insurance policy becomes effective Traumatology A chronic medical condition encoded as a 2º diagnosis at the time of discharge from a hospital

pre·ex·is·ting con·di·tion

(prē'eg-zist'ing kŏn-dish'ŭn)
A health problem that existed or for which treatment was received before the effective date of a new insurance policy.

pre·ex·is·ting con·di·tion

(prē'eg-zist'ing kŏn-dish'ŭn)
A health problem that existed or for which treatment was received before the effective date of a new insurance policy.

preexisting condition,

n in dentistry, the oral health condition of an enrollee that existed before his or her enrollment in a dental program.
References in periodicals archive ?
The AYE Act is a better deal for young people than flawed proposals that would force them to give up basic consumer protections, like protections for pre-existing conditions, in exchange for potentially lower costs.
Crespo voted to pass state-level protections for people with pre-existing conditions like cancer, diabetes or heart disease.
If you had cancer or diabetes or even a Caesarean section, insurance companies labeled it a pre-existing condition and slapped you with a whopping insurance premium.
Among the modifications that passed the House a few weeks later was a provision allowing states to waive the federal protection for people with pre-existing conditions.
While insurers could not deny people insurance because of pre-existing conditions, they would be allowed to charge them as much as they want.
Loss of coverage for pre-existing conditions is likely to also encourage other healthcare insurers to deny coverage for pre-existing conditions, including obesity.
However, if you think about it, liking the part of Obamacare that eliminates pre-existing conditions, but being opposed to the mandate does not make any sense.
The Republican proposal would do this in a more limited way: It would end pre-existing conditions limitations for those who remain continuously insured.
In the past, people with pre-existing conditions may have been turned down by health insurers if they tried to buy their own policy, or they (or their employers) were charged more.
High-risk pool enrollees with pre-existing conditions are particularly vulnerable, health care advocates warn, because a lapse in coverage could delay necessary medical care or result in extremely high costs.
It prohibits in itsurers from turning down or charging more to individuals with pre-existing conditions and even certain conditions (such as obesity) that increase the risk of health problems.
When it comes to the number of people who are uninsurable owing to pre-existing conditions, the numbers range from two million to 50 million.