prairie

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Related to Prairies: Canadian Prairies

prairie

pertaining to or emanating from the prairie.

prairie dog
small, 12 inches, 2 lb, gray-brown, herbivorous, diurnal rodent, living in burrows, in colonies or towns. Called also Cynomys ludovicianus.
prairie grass
paspalumurvillei.
References in periodicals archive ?
Prairie dogs work together to gather and share food with the rest of their family group.
He has decoded their language and says humans can learn prairie dog tongue within two hours, (http://www.
But while settlement and farming decimated other species, the prairie chicken seemed to flourish and expand.
The pocket prairies are funded by the land owners, not the city, but city officials have voiced support for the program.
Fire suppression was practiced at Pere Marquette State Park and none of the hill prairies are known to have burned during the forty year period from 1932 until 1972.
Agricultural expansion and development caused the major loss of prairie to the point that in the 1930s, prairies had mostly disappeared from southwestern Louisiana.
Initially, 259 plats with prairies and 40 plats with savanna were downloaded from the above websites.
Many of the writers do not live on the prairies, but in large cities all over Canada.
Most researchers acknowledge that restoring a prairie to a state free of human intervention is impossible.
The cultivars were relatively short, and had a wider range of colours and repeated their bloom better than roses previously developed on the prairies.
The point of the collection, according to its editors, is to interrogate and reconfigure conventional understandings of the prairies which posit or reinforce the notion that this region is timeless and frozen, at once "unchanging and unchangeable" (4).
That was, of course, before European settlement of North America and eventual conversion of much of the nation's native prairies (and prairie dog colonies) to cultivated lands, and decades of intensive, large scale prairie dog poisoning campaigns waged by western grazing interests over much of the 1900s.