Poxviridae

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Related to Pox virus: chicken pox

Pox·vir·i·dae

(poks-vir'i-dē),
A family of large complex viruses, with a marked affinity for skin tissue, which are pathogenic for humans and other animals. Virions are large, up to 250 × 400 nm, and enveloped (double membranes). Replication occurs entirely in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Capsids are of complex symmetry and contain double-stranded DNA (MW 160 × 106), the nucleoprotein antigen being common to all members of the family. Several genera are recognized, including: Orthopoxvirus, Avipoxvirus, Capripoxvirus, Leporipoxvirus, and Parapoxvirus.

Poxviridae

/Pox·vi·ri·dae/ (poks″vir´ĭ-de) the poxviruses: a family of DNA viruses with a double-stranded DNA genome, including viruses causing smallpox and the pox diseases of other animals; the two subfamilies are Chordopoxvirinae (poxviruses of vertebrates) and Entomopoxvirinae (poxviruses of insects).

Pox·vir·i·dae

(poks-vir'i-dē)
A family of large, complex viruses, with a marked affinity for skin tissue, which are pathogenic for humans and other animals; a number of genera are recognized, including, Orthopoxvirus, Avipoxvirus, Capripoxvirus, Leporipoxvirus, and Parapoxvirus.

Poxviridae

a family of viruses, the members of which are large, brick- or oval-shaped particles containing a double-strand DNA genome that replicate in the cytoplasm of cells. There are six genera in the family: (1) Orthopoxvirus, which includes alastrim, buffalopox, camelpox, cowpox, ectromelia (mousepox), horsepox, monkeypox, rabbitpox, vaccinia, variola; (2) Avipoxvirus, closely related viruses that include canarypox, fowlpox, juncopox, lovebirdpox, pigeonpox, quailpox, sparrowpox, starlingpox, turkeypox and others; (3) Capripoxvirus, which includes goatpox, lumpy skin disease, and sheeppox viruses; (4) Leporipoxvirus, which includes squirrel, hare, and rabbit (Shope) fibroma viruses and myxoma viruses; (5) Suipoxvirus, which includes swinepox virus; (6) Parapoxvirus, which includes contagious ecthyma, bovine papular stomatitis, sealionpox and pseudocowpox viruses. There are also unclassified poxviruses isolated from cats, elephants, lions, raccoons and gerbils.
References in periodicals archive ?
As well as displacing red squirrels from their habitat, grey squirrels also carry the squirrel pox virus, which they have spread to the reds.
Plum Pox Virus severely affects production of fruit-bearing and ornamental varieties of almond, apricot, cherry, nectarine, peach and plum stone fruit trees.
Fowl pox virus is a member of the genus Avipoxvirus of family Poxviridae and subfamily chordopoxviridae.
The completion of this test phase--the most comprehensive testing to date--in areas of Europe where PPV is endemic underscores HoneySweet's success as a tree that's extremely resistant to plum pox virus," says Scorza.
Another cause is a pox virus called molluscum contagiosum.
Inger Damon, chief of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) pox virus group, thinks since the sample is so old, it is "highly unlikely" that the scabs will yield live smallpox, but believes the discovery could shed some light on the development of American smallpox vaccines.
For some, chronic skin pain is the devastating aftermath of shingles, a rash triggered by reactivated chicken pox virus lying dormant in the body.
You put the naked genome into a cell which has been infected by a related pox virus, see?
Under the contract, VGX will demonstrate in vivo efficacy of novel vaccines derived from DNA plasmid-based pox virus antigens delivered using a skin micro-electroporation system.
The endangered species' population at Formby National Trust was severely hit in 2008 when around 90% died in a squirrel pox virus outbreak.
Greys carry a squirrel pox virus to which they are immune, but which spell serious danger and often death to non-immune reds.
A RELATIVE of the small pox virus may be an effective weapon against one of the deadliest forms of breast cancer, research has shown.