abortion trauma syndrome

(redirected from Post-abortion syndrome)
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A term first used in the early 1980s by Vincent Rue, a psychologist and trauma specialist for what he considered a form of post-traumatic stress disorder. The term was later used by pro-life advocates for the adverse emotional reactions that allegedly follow an abortion. It is not officially recognised as a condition a sui generis

abortion trauma syndrome

Psychology '…a medical syndrome that does not exist.' ABS is a 'nonentity' presumed to have been created by 'pro-life'–anti-abortion activists, and alleged to occur in women who have undergone abortion, who allegedly suffer deleterious physical and emotional consequences after abortion. See Abortion.
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Given the relative consensus in the medical community that abortions do not cause clinically significant psychological harm, it is clear that claims of post-abortion syndrome are not rooted in medicine and psychology, but rather stem from social attitudes about women and motherhood.
Bobbit used to rape and beat his wife, who, in turn was also well known for violent outbursts), it emphasizes the factors which led to the popularity of the post-abortion syndrome in Poland.
As I will show, (1) claims about post-abortion syndrome first appeared in the 1980s as a therapeutic, mobilizing discourse within the antiabortion movement, deployed primarily among women volunteers and clients in the "crisis pregnancy" network during a period when the antiabortion movement generally argued the moral and political case against abortion in fetal-focused terms; (2) Leaders of the antiabortion movement who passionately argued abortion as a question of protecting the unborn initially resisted woman-centered forms of antiabortion argument, but (3) came to embrace the claim strategically, under conditions of escalating social movement conflict, through a learning process in which they came to believe in the argument's power to persuade audiences outside the movement's ranks.
I was recently in Poland for the World Congress of Families, an international right-wing gathering featuring seminars on post-abortion syndrome and other topics such as the "homosexual agenda" and the threat it poses around the world.
She cites a 1980 study from the British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology that says 75 percent of women who have abortions suffer post-abortion syndrome.
Research evidence has resulted in even pro-choice researchers acknowledging the reality of post-abortion syndrome.
When you talk about the humanity of the unborn child, the pain of post-abortion syndrome, the failure of our government to protect its most vulnerable citizens, your claims carry added weight because you have credibility, because you are like them.
Although it was not yet called that at the time, the first person I ever heard speak about Post-Abortion Syndrome (PAS) was Dr.
It's a growing trend to offer a place for prayer and consolation to someone who is suffering from post-abortion syndrome, or miscarriage or stillbirth.
I've heard of post-abortion trauma and post-abortion syndrome, but never "abortion trauma syndrome.
Seminars explaining the Abortion-Breast Cancer Link, the connection between Planned Parenthood and the eugenics movement, myths and realities of stem cell research, an outline of human fetology, post-abortion syndrome, and abortion law developments are just a few of the topics covered by experts on each subject.
To be honest, it took me longer than I care to admit to realize the transformative power of Post-Abortion Syndrome (PAS).