positivism

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positivism

A school of philosophy that rejects value judgements, metaphysics and theology and holds that the only path to reliable knowledge is that of scientific observation and experiment.

positivism,

n the notion that all desired information can be obtained through data that are physically measurable.
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65) In the positivist model, a court's willingness to act to remedy an inequity is based on their recognition that the procedure outlined to protect vulnerable groups has been improperly applied to a given context.
According to positivist models, the law remains accessible because it is tied only to social facts that can be readily determined as "Judge Y has entered order Z.
Our current Canadian justice system owes much to two schools of thought that emerged in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries when social justice was somewhat less than equitable: the classical and the positivist models.
Recently, scholars such as Budd (1995) and Radford (1992) have argued that the positivist model of knowledge, far from providing useful accounts of change, may be contributing to a profound lack of understanding of how people experience their interactions with the modern academic library.