portal

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portal

 [por´tal]
1. porta.
2. pertaining to an entrance, especially the porta hepatis.
portal vein a short, thick trunk formed by the union of the superior mesenteric, inferior mesenteric, and splenic veins behind the neck of the pancreas; it ascends to the right end of the porta hepatis, where it divides into successively smaller branches, following branches of the hepatic artery, until it forms a capillary system of sinusoids that permeates the entire substance of the liver.

por·tal

(pōr'tăl),
1. Relating to any porta or hilum, specifically to the porta hepatis and the portal vein.
2. The point of entry into the body of a pathogenic microorganism.
Synonym(s): port
[L. portalis, pertaining to a porta (gate)]

portal

/por·tal/ (port´'l)
1. porta.
2. pertaining to a porta, especially the porta hepatis.

portal

(pôr′tl)
n.
The portal vein.
adj.
1. Of or relating to the portal vein or the portal system.
2. Of or relating to a point of entrance to an organ, especially the transverse fissure of the liver, through which the blood vessels enter.

portal

[pôr′təl]
Etymology: L, porta, gateway
n, an entrance.

portal

Anatomy
adjective Referring to the portal vein.
 
Informatics
noun A website that is a doorway to other sites and services on the internet; portals may offer email and other service to entice people to use the site as their main point of entry to the Web.
 
Orthopaedics
noun A small (e.g., ±1-cm) incision over a joint to provide access for arthroscopy.
 
Radiation oncology
See Port.

portal

noun Orthopedics A small–eg, ±1 cm incision over a joint to provide access for arthroscopy Radiation oncology See Port adjective AnatomyReferring to the portal vein.

por·tal

(pōr'tăl)
1. Relating to any porta or hilus, specifically to the porta hepatis and the portal vein.
2. The point of entry into the body of a pathogenic microorganism.
3. Synonym(s): field size. Synonym(s): port.
[L. portalis, pertaining to a porta (gate)]

portal

Pertaining to an entrance or gateway, especially to the porta hepatis, the fissure under the liver at which the PORTAL VEIN, the hepatic artery and the hepatic bile ducts pass through.

Portal

An entrance or a means of entrance.
Mentioned in: General Surgery

portal

entry point of any pathogenic microorganism

por·tal

(pōr'tăl)
1. Relating to any porta or hilus, specifically to the porta hepatis and the portal vein.
2. The point of entry into the body of a pathogenic microorganism.
3. Synonym(s): field size.
[L. portalis, pertaining to a porta (gate)]

portal

1. an avenue of entrance; porta.
2. pertaining to an entrance, especially the porta hepatis.

portal-azygos anastomosis
a form of portacaval shunt with the portal vein bypassing the liver and emptying directly into the azygos vein.
portal biliary bacterial circulation
a continuous normal circulation of bacteria brought to the liver in the portal vein from the gut and excreted back into the gut via the biliary system.
portal canal
tissue space situated between three or more hepatic lobules; carries the blood and lymphatic vessels and connective tissue.
portal-caval
see portacaval.
portal circulation
circulation of blood from the capillaries of one organ to those of another; applied especially to the passage of blood from the gastrointestinal tract and spleen through the portal vein to the liver. See also circulatory system.
portal of entry
the pathway by which bacteria or other pathogenic agents gain entry to the body.
portal fibrosis
see biliary fibrosis.
portal hypertension
see portal obstruction.
portal obstruction
obstruction of portal venous blood flow through external pressure on the portal vein, by abscess or tumor or by hepatic fibrosis constricting the hepatic vascular bed, causes interference with digestion and absorption and eventually venous return so that ascites and diarrhea develop.
portal system
an arrangement by which blood collected from one set of capillaries passes through a large vessel or vessels and another set of capillaries before returning to the systemic circulation, as in the pituitary gland and liver.
Includes the hepatic portal system consisting of portal vein and its tributaries from the stomach, intestine, pancreas and spleen, the vessels into which the portal vein divides in the liver and the hepatic veins that enter into the caudal vena cava.
portal systemic shunt
see portacaval shunt.
portal triad
anatomically close association of interlobular bile duct, branches of hepatic artery and portal vein.
portal vascular anomalies
see portacaval anastomosis.
portal vein
a short, thick trunk formed by the union of the caudal mesenteric and splenic veins; at the porta hepatis, it divides into successively smaller branches, following branches of the hepatic artery, until it forms a capillary system of sinusoids that permeates the entire substance of the liver.
portal vein obstruction
acute, complete obstruction causes a syndrome similar to that of intestinal obstruction without signs suggesting liver involvement; partial occlusion causes shrinkage and eventual atrophy of the relevant section of the liver.
portal vein rupture
rare complication of epiploic foraminal herniation; sudden death from internal hemorrhage results.
portal venule absence
a congenital defect resulting in the development of multiple shunts within the liver, hepatoportal fibrosis and ascites, general immaturity and hepatic encephalopathy.
References in classic literature ?
A score of blacks crowded about the entrance to watch the searchers depart, and as the last of them passed out of the village the blacks seized the portals and drew them to, and Mugambi lent a hand in the work as though the best of his life had been spent among the raiders.
Three weeks had passed since Roger de Conde had ridden out from the portals of Stutevill and many times the handsome young knight's name had been on the lips of his fair hostess and her fairer friend.
The banker strolled slowly along Pall Mall and passed through the portals of an august-looking club.
Here and there, banyan trees, like rocky islands, shouldered aside the streaming riot of vegetation between their crowded columns, showing portals and passages wherein all daylight was lost and only midnight gloom remained.
But he did not meet that exalted personage, thanks to a Cerberus of an office boy, of tender years and red hair, who guarded the portals.
And when he did return, all he told me about her was, that she had been greatly exhausted and worn by her unremitting exertions in behalf of that man who had been the scourge of her life, and had dragged her with him nearly to the portals of the grave, and was still much shaken and depressed by his melancholy end and the circumstances attendant upon it; but no word in reference to me; no intimation that my name had ever passed her lips, or even been spoken in her presence.
Those two great arches, colourless, indifferent, shouldering between them an unlovely clock, were fit portals for some eternal adventure, whose issue might be prosperous, but would certainly not be expressed in the ordinary language of prosperity.
The girl then turned towards the House of the Seven Gables, to the door of which, meanwhile,--not the shop-door, but the antique portal,--the omnibus-man had carried a light trunk and a bandbox.
But on one side of the portal, and rooted almost at the threshold, was a wild rose-hush, covered, in this month of June, with its delicate gems, which might be imagined to offer their fragrance and fragile beauty to the prisoner as he went in, and to the condemned criminal as he came forth to his doom, in token that the deep heart of Nature could pity and be kind to him.
I had believed in the best parlour as a most elegant saloon; I had believed in the front door, as a mysterious portal of the Temple of State whose solemn opening was attended with a sacrifice of roast fowls; I had believed in the kitchen as a chaste though not magnificent apartment; I had believed in the forge as the glowing road to manhood and independence.
She did not see me at first, but just as she was disappearing through the portal of the building which was to be her prison she turned, and her eyes met mine.
The idea occurred to many that either the funeral procession of some great personage had halted in front of the Province House, or that a corpse, in a velvet-covered and gorgeously-decorated coffin, was about to be borne from the portal.