population

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population

 [pop″u-la´shun]
1. the individuals collectively constituting a certain category or inhabiting a specified geographic area.
2. in genetics, a stable group of randomly interbreeding individuals.
3. in statistics, a theoretical concept used to describe an entire group or collection of units, finite or infinite; from it a sample can be drawn.

pop·u·la·tion

(pop'yū-lā'shŭn),
Statistical term denoting all the objects, events, or subjects in a particular class. Compare: sample.
[L. populus, a people, nation]

population

(pŏp′yə-lā′shən)
n.
1.
a. All of the people inhabiting a specified area.
b. The total number of such people.
2. The total number of inhabitants constituting a particular race, class, or group in a specified area.
3. The act or process of furnishing with inhabitants.
4. Ecology All the organisms that constitute a specific group or occur in a specified habitat.
5. Statistics The set of individuals, items, or data from which a statistical sample is taken. Also called universe.

population

[pop′yəlā′shən]
Etymology: L, populus, the people
1 an interbreeding group of individuals characterized by genetic continuity through several generations.
2 a group of individuals collectively occupying a particular geographic locale.
3 any group that is distinguished by a particular trait or situation.
4 any group from which samples may be measured for some variable characteristic for statistical purposes.

population

EBM
A collection of subjects from which a sample is drawn for a study to obtain estimates for values that would be obtained if the entire population was studied.

population

Clinical research Universe A group of persons to be described or about which one wishes to generalize, assuming that the group is representative of an entire population. See Control population, Patient population Global village The aggregate of persons in a specified area. See Zero population growth.

pop·u·la·tion

(pop'yū-lā'shŭn)
Statistical term denoting all the objects, events, or subjects in a particular class.
Compare: sample (1)
[L. populus, a people, nation]

population

  1. the total number of the individuals of a particular species, race or form of animal or plant, inhabiting a particular locality or region.
  2. (in genetics) the total number of BREEDING INDIVIDUALS of a species in a particular location.

pop·u·la·tion

(pop'yū-lā'shŭn)
Statistical term denoting all the objects, events, or subjects in a class.
[L. populus, a people, nation]

population,

n the instances about which a statement is made; all events, organisms, and items of a stated kind occurring or in existence in a specified time. In statistics, a hypothetic infinite supply or universe of events or objects like those being studied and from which a sample was drawn.
Enlarge picture
Pontic.
population, at-risk,
n the individuals belonging to a certain group or community who have the potential to contract a medical condition.

population

all of the animals in a specifically defined area considered as a whole. The population may also be defined in modes other than geography, e.g. the cow population, a species specification, the nocturnal bird population.

binomial population
see binomial population.
population cartogram
a map of populations.
case population
see case population.
closed population
e.g. closed herd or flock; a population into which no introductions are permitted, including artificial insemination or embryo transfer; the population is genetically and/or hygienically isolated.
comparison population
see comparison population.
contiguous p's
the populations are separated but have a common border. Some diseases are very difficult to restrain from spreading from one population to the next.
control population
see control population.
population density
see population density.
experimental population
the population in which the experiment, or trial, is being conducted.
finite population
one capable of total examination by census.
genetic population
see deme.
genetically defined population
one in which the ancestry of the animals in it is known.
population genetics
deals with the frequency of occurrence of inherited characteristics in a population.
infinite population
cannot be examined as a total population because they may never actually exist but are capable of statistical importance.
population limitation
restricting the growth of an animal population by desexing, by culling or by managemental means of interfering with reproduction.
population mean
the mean of the population.
population numbers
see population size (below).
open population
one in which immigration in and out is unrestrained.
parent population
the original population about which it is hoped to make some inferences by examination of a sample of its constituent members.
population proportion
the percentage of the population that has the subject characteristics.
population pyramid
a graphic presentation of the composition of a population with the largest group forming the baseline, the smallest at the apex.
population at risk
see risk population (below).
risk population
the population which is composed of animals that are exposed to the pathogenic agent under discussion and are inherently susceptible to it. Called also population at risk. High or special risk groups are those which have had more than average exposure to the pathogenic agent.
population size
actual counting of a total population, the census method, is not often possible in large animal populations. Alternatives are by various sampling techniques including area trapping, the trapping of all animals in an area, the capture-release-recapture method, the nearest neighbor and line transect methods,
The population size is expressed as the population present at a particular instant. Alternatively it can be expressed as an animal-duration expression when the population is a shifting one and it is desired to express the population size over a period (e.g. cow-day).
stable population
a population which has constant mortality and fertility rates, and no migration, therefore a fixed age distribution and constant growth rate.
target population
in epidemiological terms the population from which an experimenter wishes to draw an unbiased sample and make inferences about it.
References in classic literature ?
At that time the police control of the large polyglot population of Staten Island had become very lax, and scarcely a household but had its rifle or pistols and ammunition.
More and more surveys show that fertility decline there is very slow among rural and very traditional populations.
According to the United Nations Population Division estimates, 30 percent of the populations of China and Australia will be older than sixty by 2050, while South Korea's figure is 36.
So while other cities are facing issues brought on by ever-increasing populations, Berlin's future throws up some quite different challenges.
Voss said there are encouraging signs that abalone populations are also recovering on some of the other Channel Islands.
How do scientists know if the populations of certain owl species in the boreal forest are increasing or decreasing?
Handbook of Urban Health: Populations, Methods, and Practice
We highlight the utility of this framework with examples of disease threats in human and wildlife populations, showing how it allows us to understand which ecologic factors affect disease emergence and predict the impact of host shifts in a range of disease systems.
In many African countries and in small sub populations in developed countries, the rates of infection are alarmingly high.
erectus to modern humanity as populations diffused across the Old World.
What Haiti and Rwanda have in common is not just dense populations but shattered social and political institutions.
Americans have a long history of fearing the Asian hordes, yet countries like China, Japan, and Korea now face the prospect of losing up to one third of their populations over the next generation.

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