statistics

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statistics

 [stah-tis´tiks]
1. a collection of numerical data.
2. the mathematical science dealing with the collection, analysis, and interpretation of numerical data using the theory of probability, especially with methods for drawing inferences about characteristics of a population from examination of a random sample.
vital statistics data, usually collected by governmental bodies, detailing the rates of birth, death, disease, marriage, and divorce in a population.

sta·tis·tics

(stă-tis'tiks),
1. A collection of numeric values, items of information, or other facts that are numerically grouped into definite classes and subject to analysis, particularly analysis of the probability that the resulting empiric findings are due to chance.
2. The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation.

statistics

/sta·tis·tics/ (stah-tis´tiks)
1. a collection of numerical data.
2. a discipline devoted to the collection, analysis, and interpretation of numerical data using the theory of probability.

vital statistics  data detailing the rates of birth, death, disease, marriage, and divorce in a population.

statistics

[stətis′tiks]
a mathematic science concerned with measuring, classifying, and analyzing objective information.

statistics

Statistics
1. A collection of datapoints or numerical values that can be categorized and subject to analysis; statistics are the raw material on which conclusions about cause-and-effect relationships are based.
2. The field that formally studies cause-and-effect relationships; the systematic collection, classification, and mathematical compilation of data vis-á-vis amount, range, frequency, or prevalence; those methods for planning experiments, obtaining data, and organizing, summarizing, presenting, analyzing, interpreting, and drawing conclusions. See Actuarial statistics, Coefficient of variation, Cusum statistics, Descriptive statistics, Health statistics, Mean, Standard deviation, t test.

sta·tis·tics

(stă-tis'tiks)
1. A collection of numeric values, items of information, or other facts that are numerically grouped into definite classes and subject to analysis, particularly analysis of the probability that the resulting empiric findings are due to chance.
2. The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation.

statistics

See VITAL STATISTICS.

sta·tis·tics

(stă-tis'tiks)
A collection of numeric values, items of information, or other facts numerically grouped into definite classes and subject to analysis, particularly of the probability that resulting empiric findings are due to chance.

statistics,

n the branch of mathematics that gathers, arranges, condenses, coordinates, and mathematically manipulates obtained facts so that the numerical relationships between those facts may be seen clearly and freed from anomalies resulting from chance factors.
statistics, descriptive,
n.pl the statistics used to describe only the observed group or sample from which they were derived; summary statistics such as percent, averages, and measures of variability that are computed on a particular group of individuals.
statistics, inference,
n.pl the inferences made regarding characteristics or general principles about an unseen population based on the characteristics of the observed sample. Statistical findings from a sample are generalized to pertain to the entire population. The process of drawing inferences, making predictions, and testing significance are examples of inferential statistics.
statistics, nonparametric,
n.pl the sta-tistical methods used when the statistician cannot assume that the variable being studied is normally distributed in a population. Also called
distribution-free statistics.

statistics

1. numerical facts pertaining to a particular subject or body of objects.
2. the science dealing with the collection, tabulation and analysis of numerical facts.

inferential statistics
conclusions, usually quantitative, drawn from an analysis of data.
salvage statistics
statistical technique used in an attempt to derive some useful information from a poorly designed or poorly executed experiment.
vital statistics
see vital statistics.

Patient discussion about statistics

Q. What are the known statistics of Autism: Here is a question which needs a very detailed reply please. What are the known statistics of Autism: incidence, cost and ratio?

A. for more statistical information here are 2 sites:
http://www.autism-society.org/site/PageServer?pagename=about_whatis_factsstats

and here is the CDC site link:
http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/dd/addmprevalence.htm

Q. Do you know if Propecia can truly stop hair loss and even grow back hair. do you have any statistics about it? do you know if there are any side effects to this medication?

A. it does work but there is some side affects, as in E.D. while you are on the med.

Q. What is the statistic number of women having breast cancer or under the threat of having breast cancer? where would i find a good , and reliable info about the disease ?

A. it is said that today 1 out of any 8 women will have breast cancer. there are also men who has breast cancer but the numbers are considerably lower.
about a good source of info- the site that doctoradhi gave you is pretty good, and you can use also the national medical library link:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/breastcancer.html#cat22

good luck!

More discussions about statistics
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite some progress towards disciplinary recognition in the second half of the nineteenth century, success was short-lived, and demography and vital statistics were superseded by other disciplines (geometric methods in France and mathematical statistics in England), while the establishment of population statistics was overtaken by other established groups.
In the study, published by BMJ, Lucy Biddle, research fellow and her associates at the University of Bristol (England), compared suicide deaths, population statistics, divorce rates, and other data in men and women aged 15-24 and 25-34, between 1968 and 2005 (BMJ 2008 Feb.
The second updated edition of WORLD POPULATION adds to the 'Contemporary World Issues' and also stands well alone, packing in details on world population statistics, issues, and debates about changing populations, aging populations, and offering biographical sketches of scholars and researchers on the topic.
The average annual giving by individuals for 1996, based on Giving USA numbers and population statistics, was $340.
8 percent last year and Palmdale's by 3 percent, making them among the fastest-growing cities in Los Angeles County, according to state population statistics released this week.
Because the study was based solely on population statistics, it is not possible to say absolutely that hormone replacement therapy causes higher rates of breast cancer.
Since then, results of the decennial census have been used--no later than the following year--to ensure that voting districts are created using the most current population statistics.
In recent years, population statistics have shown up some consequences of this policy.
In the case of Taiwan, however, the UN does not project population statistics separately for the country.
1 Doctoral degree 1,349 Source: Current Population Statistics Note: Table made from bar graph.
WITH population statistics in freefall, do we want to attract immigrants to Scotland or not?
The numbers ignore important factors, the ad stated, which would paint a more encouraging picture - such as the artificial inflation of Arab population statistics and the deflation of the Jewish birth rate.

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