population genetics

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pop·u·la·tion ge·net·ics

the study of genetic influences on the components of cause and effect in the somatic characteristics of populations.

population genetics

n. (used with a sing. verb)
The branch of science that deals with the statistical analysis of the inheritance and prevalence of genes in populations and genetic divergence between populations.

population genetics

a branch of genetics that applies mendelian inheritance to groups and studies the frequency of alleles and genotypes in breeding populations. See also Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium principle.

pop·u·la·tion ge·net·ics

(pop'yū-lā'shŭn jĕ-net'iks)
The study of genetic influences on the components of cause and effect in the somatic characteristics of populations.

population genetics

the study of heredity at the population level, for example, gene frequencies, mating systems.

population

all of the animals in a specifically defined area considered as a whole. The population may also be defined in modes other than geography, e.g. the cow population, a species specification, the nocturnal bird population.

binomial population
see binomial population.
population cartogram
a map of populations.
case population
see case population.
closed population
e.g. closed herd or flock; a population into which no introductions are permitted, including artificial insemination or embryo transfer; the population is genetically and/or hygienically isolated.
comparison population
see comparison population.
contiguous p's
the populations are separated but have a common border. Some diseases are very difficult to restrain from spreading from one population to the next.
control population
see control population.
population density
see population density.
experimental population
the population in which the experiment, or trial, is being conducted.
finite population
one capable of total examination by census.
genetic population
see deme.
genetically defined population
one in which the ancestry of the animals in it is known.
population genetics
deals with the frequency of occurrence of inherited characteristics in a population.
infinite population
cannot be examined as a total population because they may never actually exist but are capable of statistical importance.
population limitation
restricting the growth of an animal population by desexing, by culling or by managemental means of interfering with reproduction.
population mean
the mean of the population.
population numbers
see population size (below).
open population
one in which immigration in and out is unrestrained.
parent population
the original population about which it is hoped to make some inferences by examination of a sample of its constituent members.
population proportion
the percentage of the population that has the subject characteristics.
population pyramid
a graphic presentation of the composition of a population with the largest group forming the baseline, the smallest at the apex.
population at risk
see risk population (below).
risk population
the population which is composed of animals that are exposed to the pathogenic agent under discussion and are inherently susceptible to it. Called also population at risk. High or special risk groups are those which have had more than average exposure to the pathogenic agent.
population size
actual counting of a total population, the census method, is not often possible in large animal populations. Alternatives are by various sampling techniques including area trapping, the trapping of all animals in an area, the capture-release-recapture method, the nearest neighbor and line transect methods,
The population size is expressed as the population present at a particular instant. Alternatively it can be expressed as an animal-duration expression when the population is a shifting one and it is desired to express the population size over a period (e.g. cow-day).
stable population
a population which has constant mortality and fertility rates, and no migration, therefore a fixed age distribution and constant growth rate.
target population
in epidemiological terms the population from which an experimenter wishes to draw an unbiased sample and make inferences about it.
References in periodicals archive ?
will be the same," says Jeffrey Kidd, a human population geneticist at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.
This is, I think the technical term is, a ginormous project," says study coleader Joshua Akey, a population geneticist at the University of Washington in Seattle.
In this paper I investigate the recent re-emergence of genetic race in more detail, and endeavour to ascertain how, after a half-century hiatus, a young team of population geneticists could casually rediscover race in 2002.
These results should have come as no surprise to most population geneticists, as it had long been assumed that human groups separated by physical, environmental, linguistic, and/or cultural barriers would display some degree of genetic differentiation.
Non-Neutral Evolution" seems to mark a turning point in the debate, a significant shift in how population geneticists perceive the Neutral Theory.
Based on a simple set of diffusion equations, neutralism gave population geneticists something they had hitherto lacked, a model with measurable parameters that could be applied quantitatively to the distributions of gene frequencies in nature.
According to a report in the New York Times, the estimate was made by a team of population geneticists at the University of Utah led by Chad D.
It was a tide of rigorous mathematical thinking that brought the population geneticists to supremacy over the old school of descriptive naturalists a generation ago, and it may be that the next wave will elevate the computer modelers, with their messages from the school of chaos theory.
Other population geneticists have reached a similar conclusion by examining the genes in the parasite's mitochondria.
Mayr's embrace of genetic coadaptation and organismal integration, with peripatric speciation by genetic revolution its dearest offspring, is fundamental to his stormy relations with population geneticists.
Cholera does not seem to have reached Europe until the 1800s, too late to explain the high frequency of the mutant cftr gene, say population geneticists.
For decades, the red wolf has been nearly indistinguishable genetically from either the gray wolf or the coyote, report two population geneticists who have compared DNA "fingerprints" from captive red wolves with those from frozen blood samples and museum skins.

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