popliteus muscle

(redirected from Popliteal tendon)

pop·li·te·us mus·cle

(pop-lit'ē-ŭs mŭs'ĕl)
Origin, lateral condyle of femur; insertion, posterior surface of tibia above oblique line; action, from the fully extended and "locked" position, rotates the femur medially, on the fixed (planted) tibial plateau about 5 degrees, "unlocking" the knee to enable flexion to occur; nerve supply, tibial.
Synonym(s): musculus popliteus [TA] , popliteal muscle.

popliteus muscle

A short diagonally placed muscle running from the outer side of the lower end of the thigh bone (femur) to the back of the upper part of the main lower leg bone (TIBIA). It action is to rotate the femur on the tibia, or vice versa.
References in periodicals archive ?
All these cases showed injury involving the popliteal tendon and lateral collateral ligament.
The grading of the injury at the time of the surgery was not provided, however the surgeon commented that due to the time since the injury, the PFL and popliteal tendon had healed but continued to demonstrate laxity, seen as increased space in and around the posterolateral corner during the arthroscopy.
There is inadequate evidence highlighting surgical repairs to the popliteal tendon in the absence of tears of the FCL.
Arthroscopic examination confirmed absence of damage or abrasion to the polyethylene components, with unremarkable findings on visualization of the remaining cement or bone fragments, the popliteal tendon and posterior cruciate ligament, and absence of soft tissue impingement.
In addition, if symptomatic, the popliteal tendon and the region of its femoral attachment may be tender when palpated.
Potential pain generating structures such as the lateral collateral ligament, lateral meniscus, bursae and the joint capsule should also be considered when attempting to palpate the popliteal tendon near its femoral insertion.
The tackle may have been over in an instant but the damage it caused is still being repaired as the player's lateral ligament snapped, anterior cruciate was damaged and popliteal tendon was torn and displaced.
It should also be mentioned that experimental and biomechanical studies have suggested the fabellofibular ligament (and arcuate ligament) to be less important for joint stabilization than the popliteal tendon and its associated popliteofibular ligament [4].
The lateral collateral ligament (LCL) was identified and retracted posteriorly, and the popliteal tendon was identified at its femoral insertion.
Udagawa, "Anatomy and pathophysiology of the popliteal tendon area in the lateral meniscus: 2.