Pontiac fever

(redirected from Pontiac Disease)

Pontiac fever

 [pon´te-ak]
an influenzalike illness with little or no pulmonary involvement, caused by Legionella pneumophila and first observed in Pontiac, Michigan. It is not life-threatening as is the pulmonary form known as legionnaires' disease. The syndrome appears within 2 to 3 hours of contact with an infected person and lasts 2 to 5 days. There is complete recovery without residual effects, with or without antimicrobial therapy.

Pontiac fever

An epidemic infection by a gram-negative bacterium Legionella pneumophila serogroup 6—and other Legionella spp—which generally runs its course without causing pneumonia, first described in Pontiac, Michigan, in 1968
Management Pontiac fever is a self-limited condition for which supportive care suffices and antibiotics are useless

Pontiac fever

Pontiac disease A epidemic infection by Legionella pneumophila serogroup 6–and other Legionella spp, without pneumonia, described in Pontiac, Michigan in 1968 Clinical 24-48 hr incubation, fever, headaches, myalgia, cough, ±diarrhea, neurologic signs; resolution in 1 wk. Cf Legionnaire's disease.

Pontiac fever

A disease associated with organisms of the Legionella genus and characterized by sudden fever, headache, painful muscles and debility. It does not, however, like LEGIONNAIRES' DISEASE, progress to pneumonia nor is it contagious.

Pontiac,

city in Michigan, where an outbreak of Legionella occurred in 1968.
Pontiac fever - a strain of Legionella pneumophila.