polyvinyl chloride

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Related to Polyvinylchloride: polystyrene

polyvinyl chloride

 
a tasteless, odorless, clear hard resin with many industrial uses, including as packaging, clothing, and insulation of pipes and wires. Workers in its manufacture are at risk primarily because of the toxicity of its parent compound, vinyl chloride. Excessive inhalation of its dust can cause pneumoconiosis.

pol·y·vi·nyl chlo·ride (PVC),

(pol'ē-vī'nil klōr'īd),
A polymer plastic used as a rubber substitute in many industrial applications; suspected of being carcinogenic in humans.

polyvinyl chloride (PVC)

[-vī′nil]
a tasteless, odorless, clear hard resin with many industrial uses, including packaging, clothing, and insulation of pipes and wires. Workers in its manufacture are at risk primarily because of the toxicity of its parent compound, vinyl chloride. It releases hydrochloric acid when burned. Excessive inhalation of its dust can cause pneumoconiosis.

polyvinyl chloride

PVC  Toxicology A toxin that causes interstitial lung disease due to bis(2)-ethyhexylphthalate–DEHP, an agent for 'plasticizing' vinyl chloride polymers, with narcotic effects, and causes acroosteolysis, hepatitis, soft-tissue changes, Raynaud phenomena, hepatic hemangiosarcoma–with as little as 250 ppm, brain tumors, poorly differentiated large cell CAs and adenoCA of lungs. Cf PCB, Plasticizer, Toxic dump.

pol·y·vi·nyl chlo·ride

(PVC) (pol'ē-vī'nil klōr'īd)
A polymer plastic used as a rubber substitute in many industrial applications; suspected of being carcinogenic in humans.

pol·y·vi·nyl chlo·ride

(pol'ē-vī'nil klōr'īd)
Polymer plastic used as rubber substitute in many industrial applications; suspected of being carcinogenic.

polyvinyl chloride (pol´ēvī´nəl klor´īd),

n a common synthetic thermoplastic material that releases hydrochloric acid when burned and that may contain carcinogenic vinyl chloride molecules as a contaminant.
References in periodicals archive ?
The covering of existing pilings with polyvinylchloride killed any existing populations by suffocation and prevented new infestations.
In this study, polyvinylchloride (PVC) will be used as a substrate, being the member of thermoplastic family as it is thermally low stable and responds to any kind of thermal stress or energy application.
PE or Polyethylene, PP or Polypropylene and PVC or Polyvinylchloride were purchased from a plastic factory outlet in Faisalabad, Punjab, Pakistan at Rs.
Abbreviations: MCP = metacarpophalangeal, PIP = proximal interphalangeal, PVC = polyvinylchloride.
Keywords: Polyvinylchloride, Additives, Resin, Physical properties.
based on the weight of the polyol component, of a low molecular weight organic compound having a number average molecular weight of less than about 600 Da in the presence of water, polyvinylchloride (PVC) particles having a diameter of from about 0.
Animals were housed separately in interspaced, simulated subterranean tunnel systems constructed of three polycarbonate cages (46 by 23 by 20 cm) interconnected with 15-cm pieces of 7-cm diameter polyvinylchloride (PVC) tubing.
The blending of an engaineering grade resin, such as polyvinylchloride (PVC), with an elastomer, for example, chlorinated polyethylene (CPE), can give several positive results: (1) CPE is non-volatile and does not migrate if blended with PVC; therefore compositions with CPE have a considerably longer service life than PVC alone; (2) addition of CPE to PVC reduces its brittleness, raises impact strength and fire resistance, and improves other properties; (3) addition of PVC to CPE, in turn, upgrades its barrier characteristics as well as stress-strain behaviour.
Some of the applications are found in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) strapping, polyvinylchloride (PVC) food wraps, fibrous high-density polyethylene (HDPE) ribbons for weaving sacks, breathable hygienic films in diaper liners, self-adhesive labels, and polyolefin packaging and lamination (Schut, 2005).
While vinyl has recently received criticism regarding its environmental friendliness (the main ingredients are polyvinylchloride [PVC], plasticizers, fillers, and pigment), building owners and facility managers are still specifying this versatile product.
They begin by describing the fundamentals of integrated process design, then get into specifics by describing case studies relating to process synthesis using the hierarchical approach, synthesis of separator systems, reactor/separation/recycling systems, phenol hydrogenation to cyclohexone, alkylation of benzene by propylene to cumene, vinyl chloride monomer processing, fatty-ester synthesis by catalytic distillation, isobutane alkylation, vinyl acetate monomer processing, acrylonitrile by propene ammoxidation, biochemical processes for nitrogen oxide removal, polyvinylchloride manufacturing by suspension polymerization, biodiesel and bioethanol manufacturing.
The potential health hazards of a family of polyvinylchloride plastic softeners called phthalates are presented in chapter three.