Polypogon monspeliensis

Polypogon monspeliensis

Australian grass in family Poaceae; causes poisoning when the grass seed head is infested with Anguina agrostis nematodes carrying Clavibacter toxicus producing corynetoxins; causes incoordination, tremor, convulsions, sudden death. Grass called also annual beard grass, Steward Range syndrome.
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Although we collected data on all marsh plant species, here we present only data on the most ubiquitous species (the native succulents Salicornia virginica and Arthrocnemum subterminale, the invasive grass, Parapholis incurva, and a grouping of transition/ upland species that included the native rush, Juncus bufonius, non-native grasses Polypogon monspeliensis, Lolium multiflorum, Bromus diandrus, and B.
Exotic grasses such as Parapholis incurva and Polypogon monspeliensis are not desirable in restored marshes because they occupy space, preclude the establishment of native species, and may not provide the functions (e.
tinctoria, Plantago hookeriana (Plantaginaceae) and the only exotic species encountered in the study, Polypogon monspeliensis (Poaceae) occurred on the burned transects and the largely barren wind-tidal flats.
Spartina patens Polypogon monspeliensis Plantago hookeriana Atriplex pentandra Batis maritima Sporobolus coromandelianus Total live plant cover 10.
fusca: reductions from control values in extracts were Suaeda fruticosa (80%), Kochia indica (42%), Sporobolus arabicus (38%), and Polypogon monspeliensis (29%).
Inderjit and Dakshini (1995c) reported no quantitative difference in phenolic content between soils with and without the annual weed Polypogon monspeliensis.