peptide

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peptide

 [pep´tīd]
any member of a class of compounds of low molecular weight that yield two or more amino acids on hydrolysis. They are the constituent parts of proteins and are formed by loss of water from the NH2 and COOH groups of adjacent amino acids. Peptides are known as dipeptides, tripeptides, tetrapeptides, and so on depending on the number of amino acids in the molecule. See also polypeptide.
vasoactive intestinal peptide vasoactive intestinal polypeptide.

pep·tide

(pep'tīd),
A compound of two or more amino acids in which a carboxyl group of one is united with an amino group of another, with the elimination of a molecule of water, thus forming a peptide bond, -CO-NH-; that is, a substituted amide.
See also: polypeptide. Compare: eupeptide bond, isopeptide bond.

peptide

/pep·tide/ (pep´tīd) (pep´tid) any of a class of compounds of low molecular weight that yield two or more amino acids on hydrolysis; known as di-, tri-, tetra-, (etc.) peptides, depending on the number of amino acids in the molecule. Peptides form the constituent parts of proteins.
atrial natriuretic peptide  (ANP) a hormone involved in natriuresis and the regulation of renal and cardiovascular homeostasis.
opioid peptide  opioid (2).

peptide

(pĕp′tīd′)
n.
Any of various natural or synthetic compounds containing two or more amino acids joined by peptide bonds that link the carboxyl group of one amino acid to the amino group of another.

pep·tid′ic (-tĭd′ĭk) adj.
pep·tid′i·cal·ly adv.

peptide

[pep′tīd]
Etymology: Gk, peptein, to digest
a molecular chain compound composed of two or more amino acids joined by peptide bonds. See also amino acid, polypeptide, protein.

peptide

A biomolecule consisting of two or more amino acids joined by a peptide bond, which combine to make proteins.

pep·tide

(pep'tīd)
A compound of two or more amino acids in which a carboxyl group of one is united with an amino group of another, with the elimination of a molecule of water, thus forming a peptide bond, -CO-NH-; i.e., a substituted amide.
Compare: bioregulator

peptide

A chain of two or more AMINO ACIDS linked by peptide bonds between the amino and carboxyl groups of adjacent acids. Large peptides, containing many amino acids, are called polypeptides. Chains of linked polypeptides, are called PROTEINS. Peptides occur widely in the body. Many HORMONES are peptides.

peptide

any of a group of compounds consisting of two or more amino acids linked by chemical bonding. See PEPTIDE BOND, DIPEPTIDE.

pep·tide

(pep'tīd)
Compound of two or more amino acids in which a carboxyl group of one is united with an amino group of another, with the elimination of a molecule of water, thus forming a peptide bond.

peptide,

n a compound of two or more amino acids in which the α-carboxyl group of one is united with the α-amino group of another, with the elimination of a molecule of water, creating a peptide bond —CO—NH—.
Peptostreptococcus
n a genus of nonmotile, anaerobic, chemoor-ganotrophic bacteria found in the oral cavity and intestinal tracts of normal humans. They may be pathogenic and may be found in pyogenic infections, putrefactive war wounds, and appendicitis.

peptide

any of a class of compounds of low molecular weight which yield two or more amino acids on hydrolysis; known as di-, tri-, tetra- etc. peptides, depending on the number of amino acids in the molecule. Peptides form the constituent parts of proteins. See also polypeptide.

leader peptide
a step in the signal hypothesis advanced to explain the mechanisms governing the fate of newly formed polypeptides or secretory proteins.
peptide map
a pattern of peptide fragments, characteristic of a particular protein. Produced by using either proteolytic enzymes such as trypsin or chemicals such as cyanogen bromide to cut proteins at a relatively small number of particular sites, the peptide fragments are then separated by chromatographic or electrophoretic procedures. Called also fingerprint.
peptide-para-aminobenzoic acid test
References in periodicals archive ?
The refined structure of phosphate-free bovine ribonuclease A consisted of all atoms in the polypeptide chain including hydrogens, 188 water sites with full or partial occupancy, and a single molecule of 2-methyl-2-propanol (Fig.
This process of bringing in corresponding amino acids builds the growing polypeptide chain.
The bead represents the first amino acid of the growing polypeptide chain.
Remind students that the P Site is the site where the growing polypeptide chain is made.
The E Site is the exit site for the tRNA anticodon once it deposits its amino acid from the cytoplasm onto the growing polypeptide chain.
Student 2 adds the second bead to the string, or the growing polypeptide chain.
Student 1 will remain at the P Site and hold the growing polypeptide chain.
Once a stop codon is reached, the growing polypeptide chain and tRNA molecule proceed to the E site.
The patents are directed to phage display of Fab and multi-chain antibodies, including multi- chain antibodies wherein one of the polypeptide chains comprises a heavy chain variable domain or region and a light chain variable domain or region.
The patents are directed to phage display of Fab and multi-chain antibodies, including multi-chain antibodies wherein one of the polypeptide chains comprises a heavy chain variable domain or region and a light chain variable domain or region.