polymerase

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polymerase

 [pah-lim´er-ās]
an enzyme that catalyzes polymerization.
polymerase chain reaction a rapid technique for in vitro amplification of specific DNA or RNA sequences, allowing small quantities of short sequences to be analyzed without cloning.

pol·ym·er·ase

(pol-im'ĕr-ās),
General term for any enzyme catalyzing a polymerization, as of nucleotides to polynucleotides, thus belonging to EC class 2, the transferases.

polymerase

/po·lym·er·ase/ (pah-lim´er-ās) an enzyme that catalyzes polymerization.

polymerase

(pə-lĭm′ə-rās′, -rāz′, pŏl′ə-mə-)
n.
Any of various enzymes, such as DNA polymerase, RNA polymerase, or reverse transcriptase, that catalyze the formation of polynucleotides of DNA or RNA using an existing strand of DNA or RNA as a template.

polymerase

[pə·lim′ər·ās]
any enzyme that catalyzes polymerization, especially of nucleotides to polynucleotides.

POLA1

A gene on chromosome Xp22.1-p21.3 that encodes the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase that plays a key role in initiating DNA replication.

pol·ym·er·ase

(pŏ-lim'ĕr-ās)
General term for any enzyme catalyzing a polymerization, as of nucleotides to polynucleotides, thus belonging to EC class 2, the transferases.

polymerase

Any enzyme that promotes the linkage of a number of similar or identical chemical subunits into repetitive long-chain molecules (polymers), especially of NUCLEOTIDES to form DNA or RNA. Derivation as in POLYMER with the -ase suffix denoting an enzyme.

polymerase

an enzyme that catalyses the joining of DNA or RNA nucleotides.

polymerase

an enzyme that catalyzes polymerization, particularly of nucleic acids.

polymerase chain reaction
see pcr1.
RNA polymerase
1. an enzyme that synthesizes an RNA copy of the sequence in a limited region of DNA in a process known as DNA transcription. Called also DNA-dependent RNA polymerase.
2. a viral enzyme that synthesizes RNA from an RNA template during viral replication. Called also RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.
RNA-dependent RNA polymerase
see RNA polymerase (above).
Taq polymerase
a DNA polymerase that functions at high temperature; derived from the bacterium Thermus aquaticus and used in the polymerase chain reaction.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Agilent SureDirect Blood PCR Kit includes the company's latest novel inhibitor-resistant polymerase, DMSO, and positive control template and primers, providing the ability to overcome anti-coagulant and blood PCR inhibition and allowing for robust DNA target amplification even in high blood concentrations.
In last month's installment of the Primer, we touched on transcription-mediated amplification (TMA) as an alternative to polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based strategies for the amplification and detection of specific nucleic acid sequences.
To reduce protein loss with serial dilutions, polymerases were diluted from the commercial stock solution immediately before extension reactions in 50 mmol/L Tris (pH 8.
We know that polymerases and clamp loaders can't bind the sliding clamp at the same time, so the hypothesis was that clamp loaders latched sliding clamps onto DNA, then left for some time during DNA replication, returning only to unlatch the clamps after the polymerase left so they could be recycled for further use," he added.
Describe the origin of the polymerase chain reaction.
By mixing and matching the 1918 virus' genes with genes from contemporary-flu strains, the team found that the 1918 virus' polymerase genes and its hemagglutinin gene, which sneaks the virus into cells, seem to play pivotal roles in virulence.
The highly accurate DNA polymerases that carry out DNA replication are blocked by DNA damage.
Of the methods employed in today's molecular diagnostic laboratory, none is more pervasive than the polymerase chain reaction (PCR).
It is a good target because these polymerases are essentially the same across many strains, and also because the virus absolutely needs the polymerase to make copies of itself.
Natural polymerases, on the other hand, make one mistake every 10 million bases.
The substrate virtuosity displayed by DNA polymerase [gamma] is unique among eukaryotic polymerases.
These engineered DNA polymerases contain unique amino acid modifications that confer dramatic improvements to the functionality of the enzymes when compared to wild-type polymerases.

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