polygraph

(redirected from Polygraph test)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

detector

 [de-tek´ter]
a device by which an object or condition can be discovered.
image detector any recording medium used in radiology, such as film or a cathode ray tube.
lie detector polygraph.

pol·y·graph

(pol'ē-graf),
1. An instrument to obtain simultaneous tracings from several different sources; for example, radial and jugular pulse, apex beat of the heart, phonocardiogram, electrocardiogram. The ECG is nearly always included for timing.
2. An instrument for recording changes in respiration, blood pressure, galvanic skin response, and other physiologic changes while the person is questioned about some matter or asked to give associations to relevant and irrelevant words; these physiologic changes are presumed to be indicators of emotional reactions, and thus whether the person is telling the truth. Synonym(s): lie detector
[poly- + G. graphō, to write]

polygraph

/poly·graph/ (pol´e-graf) an apparatus for simultaneously recording blood pressure, pulse, and respiration, and variations in electrical resistance of the skin; popularly known as a lie detector.

polygraph

(pŏl′ē-grăf′)
n.
An instrument that measures the physiological responses of an individual to questions from an examiner who interprets the results as indicating the likelihood that the individual is telling or not telling the truth in giving the answers.
tr.v. poly·graphed, poly·graphing, poly·graphs
To test (a criminal suspect, for example) with a polygraph.

po·lyg′ra·pher (pə-lĭg′rə-fər), po·lyg′ra·phist (-fĭst) n.
pol′y·graph′ic adj.

polygraph

[pol′ē·graf]
Etymology: Gk, polys + graphein, to write
an apparatus for simultaneously recording several mechanical or electrical impulses, such as blood pressure, pulse and respiration, and variations in electrical resistance of the skin; popularly known as lie detector.
Commonly called a lie detector. An instrument that measures and records a test subject’s sympathetic nervous system responses—pulse, blood pressure, galvanic skin conductance due to sweating, breathing rhythms, and temperature—to a series of questions, on the premise that true and false answers produce distinctive patterns of response.

polygraph

Lie detector A device designed to detect deception by evaluating physiologic responses to various spoken questions, measuring and recording changes in electrical and mechanical impulses in various parameters–eg, bp, respiratory rate, galvanic skin reflex

pol·y·graph

(pol'ē-graf)
1. An instrument for obtaining simultaneous tracings from several different sources (e.g., radial and jugular pulse, apex beat of the heart, phonocardiogram, electrocardiogram). The electrocardiogram is nearly always included for timing.
2. An instrument for recording changes in respiration, blood pressure, galvanic skin response, and other physiologic changes while the subject is interviewed or asked to give associations to relevant and irrelevant words; the physiologic changes are presumed to be emotional reactions, and thus indicative of whether the subject is telling the truth.
Synonym(s): lie detector.
[poly- + G. graphō, to write]

polygraph

An instrument that simultaneously records changes in various physiological parameter such as pulse rate, respiration rate, blood pressure and skin resistance changes from sweating. These sensitively reflect alterations in the emotions and the device is used to detect deception in answers to questions. A ‘lie detector’.

polygraph

an apparatus for simultaneously recording several mechanical or electrical impulses, such as blood pressure, pulse and respiration, and variations in electrical resistance of the skin.
References in periodicals archive ?
The court also required the trial court to make "foundational qualifications as an expert must demonstrate to the court a substantial reliability and acceptance of the polygraph to establish its probative value, describe the procedure followed in the particular polygraph test.
We are waiting for a final report of the polygraph test from the laboratory before moving the court for permission of his narco- analysis test," said a source in the CBI.
Based on the autopsy report and the polygraph test the special investigation team headed by Deputy Superintendent of Police P.
In summarizing the shortcomings of the police response to the crime, reporter Benjamin Poston wrote: "Investigators had not conducted a polygraph test, taken a blood sample, thoroughly questioned Kezer or checked his alibis, according to police records.
An unsuccessful attempt to introduce a polygraph test in a District of Columbia murder case in the 1920s led to a famous court decision.
This paper provides examples of polygraph misuses; details the increasing use of the polygraph inside and outside of law enforcement; explains what a polygraph is, what a typical polygraph test might consist of and its weaknesses in the detection of truth; and analyzes the available research with specific reference to the validity and reliability of the polygraph as scientific evidence.
Whether in a motion or on the merits, an accused may want to present evidence that he took a polygraph test to demonstrate the overbearing effect of all the relevant circumstances surrounding the interrogation.
Last November the Supreme Court heard two cases that went to the constitutional core of American jurisprudence: equality of the sexes and the right to defend oneself using polygraph test results, as discussed in this column in the January 1998 issue of the The World & I.
OSI asked Scheffer to submit to a polygraph test, and he agreed.
A potential employer says you have to take a "simple" polygraph test before being considered for the job.
A woman applies for a job with a county police department and is told she must take a polygraph test to be considered.
From the interviews, a determination is made about whether a polygraph test should be taken.