polyene

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Related to Polyenes: Azoles

polyene

 [pol´e-ēn]
1. a chemical compound with a carbon chain of four or more atoms and several conjugated double bonds.
2. any of a group of antibiotic antifungal agents with similar structure, such as amphotericin b, candicidin, or nystatin; they are produced by species of Streptomyces that damage cell membranes by forming complexes with sterols.

pol·y·ene

(pol'ē-ēn),
A chemical compound having a series of conjugated (alternating) double bonds; for example, the carotenoids.

polyene

/pol·y·ene/ (pol´e-ēn)
1. a chemical compound with a carbon chain of four or more atoms and several conjugated double bonds.
2. any of a group of antifungal antibiotics with such a structure (e.g., amphotericin and nystatin) produced by species of Streptomyces that damage cell membranes by forming complexes with sterols.

polyene

1 a chemical compound with a carbon chain of four or more atoms and several conjugated double bonds.
2 any of a group of antibiotic, antifungal agents with similar structure, such as Amphotericin B or Nystatin; they are produced by a species of Streptomyces that damage cell membranes by forming complexes with sterols.

polyene

chemical compound characterized by the presence of several conjugated double bonds.

polyene antibiotics
a group of agents, synthesized by Streptomyces spp., with antifungal activity; includes amphotericin B, nystatin and candicidin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Postantifungal effects of echinocandin, azole, and polyene antifungal agents against Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans.
Influence of antifungal polyenes on the adhesion of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata to human epithelial cells in vitro.
Polyenes bind directly to the unique fungal sterol ergosterol and compromise membrane function.
Although drugs such as polyenes, azole derivatives and fluorinated pyrimidines are presently used for treating fungal infections, a new threat has emerged due to the appearance of fungal strains resistant to these drugs.
Structurally, polyenes are tightly packed rod sheld in rigid extension by the polyene portion.
mechanisms for the growth of conjugated polyenes during the
A review of graph theory applied to aromatic molecules lists more than 1000 references [8], and an article on manual Hueckel calculations of acyclic polyenes involves simplifying the root of the secular equation with graph theory [9].
2,12) Currently, there are 4 classes of antifungal agents with activity against Aspergillus: 1) the polyenes such as amphotericin B, 2) the triazoles, including itraconazole and voriconazole, 3) the echinocandins, such as caspofungin and micofungin, and 4) the allylamines, such as terbinafine.
The authors use the Born-Oppenheimer adiabatic approximation and show the parametric method for calculations for polyenes and acenes.
While one of the least common mechanisms of antibiotic action, cell membrane disruption is accomplished by the use of the polyenes (amphotericin B for fungal diseases and polymyxin B for topical use against primarily Gram-negative bacteria).