entomophily

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entomophily

the POLLINATION of plants by insects. Such animal pollinators are one of the two main mechanisms for the transport of pollen to the stigma, the other being ANEMOPHILY. In entomophilous flowers the colours are adapted to their pollinators, for example, moths are mainly active at dusk and at night and they visit flowers that are mostly white; bees cannot see red and will visit mainly blue or yellow flowers. Many flowers have patterns visible only with ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT which insects (but not mammals) can detect. Deep flowers are pollinated by insects with long mouthparts, and short flowers by insects with short mouthparts, an example of COEVOLUTION of plants and insects.
References in periodicals archive ?
Larger amount of fruits after pollination by insects compared to fruit production in bagged flowers was found in some cultivars with hermaphrodite V.
Pollination by insects is a very sensitive and complex process and, as a matter of fact, these are qualitative properties, which cannot be measured in terms of economic index.
For example, the Oregon fawn lily changes colors following pollination by insects, Jackson said.
Bees account for around 80% of pollination by insects, according to global agricultural societies.
When considering the three treatments and the pollinator abundance in the two-level GLMMs, bagging negatively reduced both the initial fruit set (Model 1 in Table 3) and the final fruit set (Model 2 in Table 3), whereas pollination by insects had a positive influence on the initial fruit set (Model 1 in Table 3) and the final fruit set (Model 2 in Table 3).
Honeybees account for 80 percent of plant pollination by insects.
It encourages pollination by insects and other animals.
Bees account for 80 percent of plant pollination by insects, which is vital to global food production.
It is estimated that bees account for 80 per cent of plant pollination by insects, making them a vital part of global food production.
Take pollination of crops: According to a United Nations report, the total economic value of pollination by insects worldwide was in the ballpark of $200 billion in 2005.
The National Trust's conservation adviser Matthew Oates said spring-flowering trees and shrubs had benefited from the hot, sunny spring which had boosted blossoming and pollination by insects.
in the same way, net production of achenes due to pollination by insects ([A.