Plott hound

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Plott hound

a medium-sized, sturdy dog with large, pendulous ears. The black and brindle coat is short and the tail is long and tapered. The breed is used in packs for hunting bear, wild boar, wolves and mountain lions, traditionally in the Great Smoky Mountains of the eastern United States.
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In the five years following the publication of the Plott and Zeiler studies in the high-profile American Economic Review, fewer than ten percent of legal publications referring to the endowment effect bothered to cite Plott and Zeiler's work.
According to Plott, the aim of experimental economics is to specify the parameter space of a model and to test its predictions without imposing equilibrium solutions.
Plott, 1997, Exchange Economies and Loss Exposure: Experiments Exploring Prospect Theory and Competitive Equilibria in Market Environments, American Economic Review, 87(5): 801-828.
The findings of Plott and Zeiler (2005, 2007) which suggest that exchange anomalies reflect processes similar to those occurring during an anchoring protocol increases the importance of understanding whether and how anchors may endure in the marketplace.
Sinclair and Plott (2012) argue that voters engage in an updating process wherein they accumulate more information over an election cycle to reach their tru preference among the candidates in the election.
When Sean Plott was 15, he and his older brother, Nick, begged their mother to fly them from Kansas to Los Angeles for a video game tournament.
When a policy decision impacts multiple-dimensions, the median voter result no longer generally applies; Plott (1967) shows that only under extremely limited conditions does an equilibrium exist.
In one case the High Court made a winding up order against Plott UK and approved the appointment of a liquidator who will now identify, realise, and distribute the company's assets to its creditors.
But despite its seemingly necessary usage in economics to mean 'maximization or consistency' (1), some authors such as Charles Plott observed that the concept of rationality 'lacks scientific precision and as a result is a source of needless controversy and misunderstandings' (1).
Variations of the following general convergence model (1) were estimated to describe the data and allow for statistical comparisons (Ashenfelter and Genesove 1992; Noussair, Plott.
The classroom experiment described below is conceptually similar to the general equilibrium research experiment of Noussair, Plott, and Riezman (1997).