Plato


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Related to Plato: Aristotle, Socrates

Plato,

Greek philosopher, 427-347 B.C.
platonic love - a love in which there is no sexual desire.
References in classic literature ?
The second question, whether Plato meant to represent Socrates as braving or irritating his judges, must also be answered in the negative.
Nor are the reasonings of Schleiermacher, who argues that the Platonic defence is an exact or nearly exact reproduction of the words of Socrates, partly because Plato would not have been guilty of the impiety of altering them, and also because many points of the defence might have been improved and strengthened, at all more conclusive.
There was the soul of Cratinus - passable: Aristophanes - racy: Plato exquisite not your Plato, but Plato the comic poet; your Plato would have turned the stomach of Cerberus - faugh
We are accustomed since the growth of the historical method to the belief that states are "not made but grow," and are apt to be impatient with the belief which Aristotle and Plato show in the powers of the lawgiver.
It is one of the most marked characteristics of Greek political theory that Plato and Aristotle think of the statesman as one who has knowledge of what ought to be done, and can help those who call him in to prescribe for them, rather than one who has power to control the forces of society.
But Plato certainly does not mean to intimate that the supernatural or divine is the true basis of human life.
Also here, as in the Ion and Phaedrus, Plato appears to acknowledge an unreasoning element in the higher nature of man.
Again, Plato may be regarded as the "captain" ('arhchegoz') or leader of a goodly band of followers; for in the Republic is to be found the original of Cicero's De Republica, of St.
When a thought of Plato becomes a thought to me,--when a truth that fired the soul of Pindar fires mine, time is no more.
Hence Plato said that "poets utter great and wise things which they do not themselves understand.
The fact that Socrates precedes Plato is symbolized in English by the fact that the word "precedes" occurs between the words "Socrates" and "Plato.
For example, if the proposition is "Socrates precedes Plato," the objective which verifies it results from replacing the word "Socrates" by Socrates, the word "Plato" by Plato, and the word "precedes" by the relation of preceding between Socrates and Plato.