plastron

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Related to Plastrons: Turtle shell

plas·tron

(plas'tron),
The sternum with costal cartilages attached.
[Fr. a breastplate]

plastron

(plăs′trŏn) [Fr., breastplate]
The sternum and attached cartilages.

plastron

  1. the film of air covering parts of the body in aquatic insects such as water beetles, which enables them to stay under water. The film acts as a gill since gas exchange takes place between the water and the air bubble (plastron respiration).
  2. the horny bridge connecting the sides of the carapace below the body of tortoises and turtles.

plastron

skeletal structure protecting the abdomen of chelonians.
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Plastron of the tortoise. By permission from Aspinall V, O'Reilly M, Introduction to Veterinary Anatomy and Physiology, Butterworth Heinemann, 2004
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References in periodicals archive ?
The plastron (bottom shell) is reduced in size, exposing large fleshy areas around the base of each leg.
Spiracles on desert Phlaeothripidae appear to function as plastrons by repelling water and trapping air.
After a tortoise was removed from a trap, the plastron was brushed by hand and rinsed with approximately 3-5 ml of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) to remove fine particulate matter.
The model transcends sexual identity of the turtles by using data on three-year old females to predict plastron length in melanistic males.
The plastron and carapace were inspected for damage indicative of disease or scavenging, and all shell and non-shell elements were collected and saved for inspection in the laboratory.
Moreover, with recent image analysis techniques (Davis and Grayson, 2007; Davis and Maerz, 2007), bilateral scute pairs in turtle shells, especially those on the flat ventral plastrons, can now be easily photographed and measured digitally which should allow researchers to record even subtle deviations in left-right scute sizes.
Virtually all hatchlings manifested mandibular cusps, eyebars and reddish plastrons (with vermiculations).
47 Mochii Yasutaka [Chinese Text Omitted]("In ocho no kozo ni kansuru ichi shiron" [Chinese Text Omitted], Toyo bunka kenkyujo kiyo [Chinese Text Omitted] 82 [1980]: 64-88) has identified a group of approximately 220 "Ding lineage" (dingzu [Chinese Text Omitted]) inscriptions, all carved on turtle plastrons, excavated mainly from YH251 and 330.
Counting growth annuli is more accurate for younger turtles due to the tendency for annuli to grow closer together with age and for plastrons to wear smooth, obliterating annuli (Galbraith and Brooks, 1987; Brooks et al.
Carapaces proved more useful than plastrons to examine temporal aspects of disarticulation.