phytopathology

(redirected from Plant pathology)
Also found in: Dictionary, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Plant pathology: plant disease, phytopathology

phytopathology

/phy·to·pa·thol·o·gy/ (-pah-thol´ah-je) the pathology of plants.
References in periodicals archive ?
The acting VC told the students that the Board of Studies in the Institute of Mycology and Plant Pathology and the Board of Faculty of Life Sciences have already given their approval to the change of nomenclature from the Institute of Mycology and Plant Pathology to Institute of Plant Pathology, in addition to changing the nomenclature of degrees from BSc and MSc Mycology and Plant Pathology to BSc and MSc Agriculture by adopting the curricula of the Higher Education Commission (HEC) in Plant Pathology for the said degrees.
degree in plant pathology from Michigan State University and a postdoctoral fellowship from the University of Missouri.
Vladimir Shulaev joined Agritope as director of plant pathology and stress physiology.
Contract notice: Binocular loupe and microscope delivery llu lf plant pathology and entomology laboratory needs, the ministry of agriculture grant agreement no.
in the Netherlands) bring together a reference intended to supplement existing texts used by research workers, teachers and advanced students in plant virology, plant pathology, crop protection, molecular biology and plant breeding.
Agrobacterium tumefaciens; from plant pathology to biotechnology.
in Plant Pathology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.
Mississippi State University's state-of-the-art Plant Pathology and Nematology Lab, part of the Southern Plant Diagnostic Network, will help you search for the source of your plant's pain and offer a healthy solution for its recovery.
D'Arcy's ESSENTIAL PLANT PATHOLOGY (0890543429, $79.
With high-level golf comes high expectations,'' said Dyer, who studied turf grass science and plant pathology at Ohio State University.
Ahead of the meeting, Randy Ploetz, plant pathology professor at the University of Florida, warned that if witches' broom, today primarily found in South America, were to spread to Africa where almost 70% of production occurs, the chocolate industry would be devastated.