Pityrosporum ovale

Ma·las·sez·i·a fur·'fur

a fungus species that is normal skin flora but can cause tinea versicolor, folliculitis, or fungemia in patients receiving intravenous lipids.

Pityrosporum ovale

Malassezia furfur

A lipophilic yeast associated with tinea vesicolor, seborrhoeic dermatitis, folliculitis or atopic dermatitis. M furfur has also been associated with  pneumonia, catheter-associated sepsis and peritonitis. M furfur has been divided into lipid-dependent Malassezia strains: M furfur, M sympodialis, M globosa, M obtusa, M restricta and M slooffiae.
References in periodicals archive ?
A fungus (yeast) infection with pityrosporum ovale called tinea versicolor, which interferes with skin pigmentation.
La fase micelial de estas levaduras fue designada por muchos anos con el nombre de Malassezia furfur, mientras que a los dos tipos morfologicos de la fase de levadura se les llamo Pityrosporum ovale y P orbiculare.
Pityrosporum ovale culture from the forehead of healthy children.
3-4) Tea tree oil has been shown to inhibit or kill many detrimental micro-organisms such as Eschericia coli, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Propionibacterium acnes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus pyogenes, detrimental fungi on the skin, Candida albicans, Pityrosporum ovale, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, detrimental protozoa, Trichomonas vaginalis, and Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1-2.
One showed that patients with atopic dermatitis of the head and neck developed IgE antibodies against the yeast Pityrosporum ovale much more often than did their control group.
Experts are certain that the yeast pityrosporum ovale is linked to dandruff but they are unclear whether it actually causes it, or whether the flaky skin provides an ideal environment for the yeast to thrive.
Ovace provides a broad spectrum of activity against Pityrosporum ovale, as well as both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.
In the last 2 years, there have been 37 published studies--nearly all of them from Europe and Asia--supporting a link between atopic dermatitis and airborne allergens such as dust mites, cat dander, and Pityrosporum ovale.
The culprit is a natural yeast called Pityrosporum Ovale.
A leading theory is that dandruff is caused by the yeast-like fungus, Pityrosporum ovale, which occurs naturally on everyone's scalp.