Pimelea


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Pimelea

Australian genus of poisonous annual herbs and perennial shrubs in the family Thymelaeaceae; cause two major syndromes: (1) generalized edema, called also St. George or Moree disease, caused in cattle only by a diterpenoid ester, simplexin; the syndrome is one of chronic, right-sided heart failure leading to hydrothorax, massive anasarca and jugular vein distention plus profound anemia and persistent diarrhea; (2) in species other than cattle the only sign is severe diarrhea and a fatal outcome caused by dihydroxycoumarin glycosides; toxic species include P. decora (Flinders poppy), P. elongata, P. flava, P. glauca, P. haematostachya (pimelea or red poppy), P. latifolia (P. altior), P. linifolia, P. microcephala, P. neo-anglica, P. pauciflora, P. prostrata (Strathmore weed), P. simplex, P. trichostachya. Called also many common names, mostly some variation on riceflower, flaxweed.
References in periodicals archive ?
The flowers of a number of Thymelaeaceae are monosymmetric by reduction: some Pimelea species have a single stamen, in other genera the gynoecium is pseudomonomerous (Eckardt, 1937; Herber, 2003).
Physalis minima * * Pimelea microcephala * * Piper novae-hollandiae * Planchonella australis * Podocarpus elatus * Polyalthia nitidissima * Polyscias sambucifolia * * Psychotria simmondsiana * Randia sp.
Intervascular pit pairs in woods of Gnidia caffra, Dirca palustris, and two species of Pimelea were observed with both light and scanning electron microscopy.
and two species of Pimelea with emphases on the presence or absence of a torus, the outline of the pit apertures, and presence or absence of vestures.
Daphne, Dirca, and Pimelea have tracheids as well as vessel members; Gnidia has only the latter.
Species of Gnidia and Pimelea used in this study have irregularities known as vestures along the rims of their pit apertures (Figs.
The more distantly related genera, Drapetes, Gnidia, and Pimelea (different tribe, same subfamily) also have no tori.
The weakness of non-torus bearing membranes can be observed in Pimelea membranes (Fig.
Clearly, in this study the circularity ratio is much less for pit apertures of Pimelea and Gnidia than for Daphne and Dirca.
However, construction of the vestures in Pimelea (Fig.
The presence of vestures in Pimelea has been extended t o the species P.