physiology

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physiology

 [fiz″e-ol´o-je]
1. the science that treats of the functions of the living organism and its parts, and of the physical and chemical factors and processes involved.
2. the basic processes underlying the functioning of a species or class of organism, or any of its parts or processes.
cell physiology the scientific study of phenomena involved in cell growth and maintenance, self-regulation and division of cells, interactions between nucleus and cytoplasm, and general behavior of protoplasm.
morbid physiology (pathologic physiology) the study of disordered functions or of function in diseased tissues.

phys·i·ol·o·gy

(fiz'ē-ol'ŏ-jē),
The science concerned with the normal vital processes of animal and vegetable organisms, especially as to how things normally function in the living organism rather than to their anatomic structure, their biochemical composition, or how they are affected by drugs or disease.
[L. or G. physiologia, fr. G. physis, nature, + logos, study]

physiology

/phys·i·ol·o·gy/ (-je)
1. the science which treats of the functions of the living organism and its parts, and of the physical and chemical factors and processes involved.
2. the basic processes underlying the functioning of a species or class of organism, or any of its parts or processes.

morbid physiology , pathologic physiology the study of disordered function or of function in diseased tissues.

physiology

(fĭz′ē-ŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The biological study of the functions of living organisms and their parts.
2. All the functions of a living organism or any of its parts.

phys′i·ol′o·gist n.

physiology

[fiz′ē·ol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, physis + logos, science
1 the study of the processes and function of the human body.
2 the study of the physical and chemical processes involved in the functioning of organisms and their parts. Kinds of physiology include comparative physiology, developmental physiology, hominal physiology, and pathological physiology. Compare anatomy.

physiology

See Applied physiology, Cardiac electrophysiology, Clinical neurophysiology.

phys·i·ol·o·gy

(fiz'ē-ol'ŏ-jē)
The science concerned with the normal vital processes of animal and vegetable organisms, especially as to how things normally function in the living organism rather than as to their anatomic structure, their biochemical composition, or how they are affected by drugs or disease.
[L. or G. physiologia, fr. G. physis, nature, + logos, study]

physiology

The study of the functioning of living organisms, especially the human organism. Physiology includes BIOCHEMISTRY but this is such a large discipline that it is followed as a separate speciality. Together with ANATOMY and PATHOLOGY, physiology is the basis of medical science.

physiology

the study in animals, plants and microorganisms of those internal processes and functions associated with life.

physiology

the branch of biological science concerned with the normal bodily function of living organisms, hence physiologist. Also those functions themselves, as for example the physiology of digestion, of vision, of locomotion, etc. adj physiological.

physiology,

n in biological sciences, study concerned with the processes and functioning of organisms.

phys·i·ol·o·gy

(fiz'ē-ol'ŏ-jē)
Science concerned with normal vital processes of organisms, especially as to how things normally function in living organism rather than to their anatomic structure.
[L. or G. physiologia, fr. G. physis, nature, + logos, study]

physiology (fiz´ēol´əjē),

n the study of tissue and organism behavior. The physiologic process is a dynamic state of tissue as compared with the static state of descriptive morphology (anatomy). Physiology is differentiated from descriptive morphology by the following qualifying properties: rate, direction, and magnitude. Physiologic processes are thus morphologic alterations in the three dimensions of space associated with a temporary (time) sequence. Physiologic processes relate to a wide spectrum of life activities on three levels: biochemical and biophysical activity of a subcellular nature, the activity of cells and tissues aggregated into organ systems, and multiorgan system activity as expressed in human behavior.
physiology, oral,
n the physiology related to clinical manifestations in the normal and abnormal behavior of oral structures. The principal clinical functions in which the oral structures participate are deglutition, mastication, respiration, speech, and head posture.

physiology

1. the science which deals with the functions of the living organism and its parts, and of the physical and chemical factors and processes involved.
2. the basic processes underlying the functioning of a species or class of organism, or any of its parts or processes.

cell physiology
the scientific study of phenomena involved in cell growth and maintenance, self-regulation and division of cells, interactions between nucleus and cytoplasm, and general behavior of protoplasm.
morbid physiology, pathological physiology
the study of disordered functions or of function in diseased tissues.
References in periodicals archive ?
Several techniques employed by the exercise physiologist to speed and shorten the recovery process of players become even more critical in such competitions.
Physiologist Rene Groscolas of the Center for Ecology and Metabolic Physiology in Strasbourg, France, has watched the penguins march in Antarctica.
The work of a respiratory physiologist must be reliable and accurate as patients' lives often depend on their skills.
Aerospace physiologists constantly poke and probe to learn as much as they can about an aviator's responses to the flight environment.
Exercise physiologists now unanimously agree the Light-Load/High-Speed training (now referred to as "Low-Load/Velocity-Specific" training) produces the most transferable benefits to sports-field performance.
Exercise physiologists stay alert for patient difficulties and are prepared to handle emergencies.
In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, French clinicians, German physiologists, and, later, British bacteriologists bad clear notions of their own claims to reliable science.
May 2 /PRNewswire/ -- Medical Graphics Corporation (NASDAQ: MGCC) announced today it has introduced the CardiO-KEY, a "smart" key that can be programmed by physicians or exercise physiologists with an individual's exercise prescription.
Pammenter and Patricia Berjak, plant physiologists visiting her laboratory from the University of Natal, Durban, South Africa.
Designed and managed by CXphys Cincinnati Exercise Physiologists, Training with Friends encourages anyone interested in physical activity, regardless of fitness level, to participate in proven and well-rounded workouts.
1 ( ANI ): Various physiologists and experts have backed Chinese teen sensation Ye Shiwen's incredible gold medal winning performances at the London Olympics, saying her performances were not physiologically impossible.
Having worked with the national team of Egypt seven years ago, I was surprised to find during this last trip that there are still no exercise physiologists within Egyptian football.