adsorption

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adsorption

 [ad-sorp´shun]
the action of a substance in attracting and holding other materials or particles on its surface; see also absorption.
attachment (def. 2).

ad·sorp·tion

(ad-sōrp'shŭn), Do not confuse this word with absorption.
The property of a solid substance of attracting and holding to its surface a gas, liquid, or a substance in solution or in suspension, for example, condensation of a gas onto a surface. Compare: absorption.
[L. ad, to, + sorbeo, to suck up]

adsorption

/ad·sorp·tion/ (ad-sorp´shun) the action of a substance in attracting and holding other materials or particles on its surface.

adsorption

[adsôrp′shən]
Etymology: L, ad + sorbere, to suck in
a natural process whereby molecules of a gas or liquid adhere to the surface of a solid. The phenomenon depends on an assortment of factors such as surface tension and electrical charges. Many biological reactions involve adsorption. Adsorption is the principle on which chromatography is based and which allows for the separation of a mixture into component fractions for qualitative analysis. See also chromatography. adsorb, v.

Adsorption

Chemistry An accumulation/concentration of molecules of a gas or liquid on a surface interfacing with the gas or liquid, resulting in a relatively high surface concentration.
Histology The accumulation of a substance on a surface affected by the affinities of acids to bases—and vice versa—based on electrical attraction; adsorption may explain differential affinity for dyes that occurs in histologic preparations of tissues being examined by light microscopy.
Immunology The removal of nonspecific agglutinins, by incubating the fluid of interest in a serum—e.g., of bovine origin—which lacks the antigens to be measured.
Virology The adhesion of a substance to an organic particle in a solution—e.g., adhesion of a virus to a cell.

ad·sorp·tion

(ad-sōrp'shŭn)
The property of a solid substance to attract and hold to its surface a gas, liquid, or a substance in solution or in suspension.
Compare: absorption
[L. ad, to, + sorbeo, to suck in]

adsorption

The process by which a substance, such as a gas or dissolved solid, is attracted to, and adheres to, a surface.

adsorption

the taking up of gas or liquid by a surface or interface. In physical adsorption, molecules are held by VAN DER WAAL'S FORCES of attraction; in chemical adsorption there is exchange or sharing of electrons. Compare ABSORPTION.

Adsorption

The binding of a chemical (e.g., drug or poison) to a solid material such as activated charcoal or clay.
Mentioned in: Charcoal, Activated

adsorption,

n a process in which gaseous material builds up on the outermost layer of a solid and forms a light film.

ad·sorp·tion

(ad-sōrp'shŭn) Do not confuse this word with absorption.
The property of a solid substance of attracting and holding to its surface a gas, liquid, or a substance in solution or in suspension.
[L. ad, to, + sorbeo, to suck in]

adsorption,

n a natural process whereby molecules of a gas or liquid adhere to the surface of a solid.

adsorption

the action of a substance in attracting and holding other materials or particles on its surface.
References in periodicals archive ?
The unique properties of MCM-41 make it suitable for enzyme immobilization through physical adsorption and covalent binding methods.
While the green inhibitor molecule most supposedly acts by being adsorbed on zinc surface by physical adsorption, the overall inhibition is believed to be provided by a synergistic effect.
The values are also consistent with data expected for the mechanism of physical adsorption ([E.
The Langmuir equation has wider application to chemical adsorption and the adsorption of solute from solution but with limited applicability to physical adsorption.
In the kinetic studies, the minimum sum of SNE points to the Lagergren first order kinetic model as best kinetic model for MIP sorbents, fact that suggests physical adsorption of template molecules in the molecularly imprinted sites based on noncovalent interactions that take place in the recognition process between the template's molecules and the MIP's imprinted cavities.
1995), physical adsorption in cinnamon soil and chemical adsorption in red soil could be identified as the dominant mechanisms of tetracycline adsorption.
The adsorption of inhibitor is considered either as physical adsorption or chemisorption.
05) between values of inhibition efficiency of Musa acuminate peel obtained at 303 and 333 K suggests that the mechanism of adsorption of inhibitor on mild steel surface was by physical adsorption (Eddy.
The trend of inhibition efficiency with temperature to be suggested physical adsorption of these compounds on the corroding amorphous surface.
In an ELISA, a biological substance (antibody or antigen) must first be immobilized onto the inner surfaces of polystyrene microtiter wells, usually by physical adsorption.
Similarly, all the hydrogels show chemical adsorption for low concentration of dye and physical adsorption for high concentration dye as observed from n values of Freundlich isotherm for basic fuchsin dye given in Table 3.
Two different phenomena occurred: ozone decomposition on Fau Y silanol groups induced by the de-alumination step; and physical adsorption in silicalite porosity (Monneyron et al.

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