photon

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photon

 [fo´ton]
a discrete particle (quantum) of radiant energy.

pho·ton (hν, γ),

(fō'ton),
In physics, a corpuscle of energy or particle of light; a quantum of light or other electromagnetic radiation.

photon

/pho·ton/ (fo´ton) a particle (quantum) of radiant energy.

photon

(fō′tŏn′)
n.
The elementary particle of light and other electromagnetic radiation; the quantum of electromagnetic energy. The photon is the massless, neutral vector boson that mediates electromagnetic interactions.

pho·ton′ic adj.

photon

[fō′ton]
Etymology: Gk, phos, light
the smallest quantity of electromagnetic energy. It has no mass and no charge but travels at the speed of light. Photons may occur in the form of x-rays, gamma rays, or quanta of light. The energy (E) of a photon is expressed as the product of its frequency (v) and Planck's constant (h), as in the equation E = hv. X-ray photons occur in frequencies of 1018 to 1021 Hz and energies that range upward from 1 KeV.

pho·ton

(γ) (fō'ton)
physics A corpuscle of energy or particle of light; a quantum of light or other electromagnetic radiation.

photon

a quantum of radiant energy with a wavelength in the visible range of the ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM.

Photon

A light particle.

photon 

The basic unit of radiant energy defined by the equation
E = hν
where h is Planck's constant (6.62 ✕ 10−34 joule ✕ second), ν the frequency of the light and E the energy difference carried away by the emission of a single photon of light. The term photon usually refers to visible light whereas the term quantum refers to other electromagnetic radiations. See quantum theory; wave theory; troland.

pho·ton

(γ) (fō'ton)
In physics, corpuscle of energy or particle of light; a quantum of light or other electromagnetic radiation.

photon (fō´ton),

n a bullet or quantum of electromagnetic radiant energy emitted and propagated from various types of radiation sources. The term should not be used alone but should be qualified by terms that will clarify the type of energy (e.g., light photon, radiographic photon).

photon

a particle (quantum) of radiant energy.

x-ray photon
a particle of x-ray energy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus the idea that cell tower photons could make you sick does not seem plausible to me.
Sharing an encryption key between any two users requires sending single photons--entangled photons in the case of Ekert's scheme.
Photopneumatic Therapy dramatically increases photon absorption, reducing the overall energy required and significantly widening the otherwise very narrow safety margins," he said.
In such a delayed-choice experiment, physicists inject a photon into an interferometer.
Beta decay of the neutron into a proton, electron, and electron antineutrino is occasionally accompanied by the emission of a photon.
He blends materials and uses the latest techniques for etching and buffing them to produce pathways for light that actually squeeze photons into a single dimension.
Entanglement establishes a connection between particles so that physicists can measure a property of one photon and determine what the value of that property will be when the partner photon is measured.
But confirming the entanglement of more than two photons can be done only after measuring the particles, which destroys their entanglement.
A NIST scientist has demonstrated the emission of individual photons on demand, a major accomplishment in the development of "single photonics," which utilizes the photon as the fundamental particle of optical metrology.
The newest addition to PerkinElmer's line of imaging solutions, the SPCM-AQ4C is the industry's only four-channel photon counting card that detects single photons over a wavelength range from 400 nm to 1100 nm.
We didn't detect any photons coming from the object, but we got a surprisingly clear image," says physicist and lead author Gabriela Lemos of the University of Vienna.