photon

(redirected from Photons)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.
Related to Photons: Virtual photons

photon

 [fo´ton]
a discrete particle (quantum) of radiant energy.

pho·ton (hν, γ),

(fō'ton),
In physics, a corpuscle of energy or particle of light; a quantum of light or other electromagnetic radiation.

photon

/pho·ton/ (fo´ton) a particle (quantum) of radiant energy.

photon

(fō′tŏn′)
n.
The elementary particle of light and other electromagnetic radiation; the quantum of electromagnetic energy. The photon is the massless, neutral vector boson that mediates electromagnetic interactions.

pho·ton′ic adj.

photon

[fō′ton]
Etymology: Gk, phos, light
the smallest quantity of electromagnetic energy. It has no mass and no charge but travels at the speed of light. Photons may occur in the form of x-rays, gamma rays, or quanta of light. The energy (E) of a photon is expressed as the product of its frequency (v) and Planck's constant (h), as in the equation E = hv. X-ray photons occur in frequencies of 1018 to 1021 Hz and energies that range upward from 1 KeV.

pho·ton

(γ) (fō'ton)
physics A corpuscle of energy or particle of light; a quantum of light or other electromagnetic radiation.

photon

a quantum of radiant energy with a wavelength in the visible range of the ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM.

Photon

A light particle.

photon 

The basic unit of radiant energy defined by the equation
E = hν
where h is Planck's constant (6.62 ✕ 10−34 joule ✕ second), ν the frequency of the light and E the energy difference carried away by the emission of a single photon of light. The term photon usually refers to visible light whereas the term quantum refers to other electromagnetic radiations. See quantum theory; wave theory; troland.

pho·ton

(γ) (fō'ton)
In physics, corpuscle of energy or particle of light; a quantum of light or other electromagnetic radiation.

photon (fō´ton),

n a bullet or quantum of electromagnetic radiant energy emitted and propagated from various types of radiation sources. The term should not be used alone but should be qualified by terms that will clarify the type of energy (e.g., light photon, radiographic photon).

photon

a particle (quantum) of radiant energy.

x-ray photon
a particle of x-ray energy.
References in periodicals archive ?
While photons normally have no mass and travel at 300,000 kilometers per second (the speed of light), the researchers found that the bound photons actually acquired a fraction of an electron's mass.
The goal is to specify and control every aspect of the photons quantum state, constraining everything to a single mode so that the photons emitted from the single-photon source are identicaleach one indistinguishable from the next, ORNL co-inventor Nicholas Peters said.
Just as Cotler and Wilczek expected, the experimenters couldn't formulate a chronology that was consistent with both the starting and ending measurements of each photon and the mirror-based evidence in between.
Figure 1 shows a CCD camera image of photons generated via SPDC.
Thus the idea that cell tower photons could make you sick does not seem plausible to me.
Sharing an encryption key between any two users requires sending single photons--entangled photons in the case of Ekert's scheme.
By using a switch to manipulate photons, optical transistors can be created which could pave the way to a new generation of quantum computers and solve problems that traditional computers would have difficulty with," Resch says, including database searches and the ability to crack codes on the Internet.
Proposed theoretically in 1993, teleportation is a way of preserving and transmitting information about photons, such as their likelihood of passing through filters like polarized sunglass lenses.
The patented technology is a breakthrough combination of the unique properties of pneumatic energy and broadband light -- delivering photons to treatment targets up to five times more efficiently than traditional light-based devices.
As photons travel through an optic fiber medium carrying information, some of them gets scattered.
Individual photons of light now can be detected far more efficiently using a device patented (link is external) by a team including the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), whose scientists have overcome longstanding limitations with one of the most commonly used type of single-photon detectors.
Researchers exploited light's twistiness to establish a delicate quantum connection called entanglement between pairs of photons.