phosphate

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Related to Phosphate Mineral: phosphate rock, Phosphate Ore, Carbonate Mineral, Sulfate Mineral

phosphate

 [fos´fāt]
any salt or ester of phosphoric acid. adj., adj phosphat´ic.

Phosphates are widely distributed in the body, the largest amounts being in the bones and teeth. They are continually excreted in the urine and feces and must be replaced in the diet. Inorganic phosphates function as buffer salts to maintain the acid-base balance in blood, saliva, urine, and other body fluids. The principal phosphates in this buffer system are monosodium and disodium phosphate. Organic phosphates, in particular adenosine triphosphate (ATP), take part in a series of reversible reactions involving phosphoric acid, lactic acid, glycogen, and other substances, which furnish the energy expended in muscle contraction. This is thought to occur through the hydrolysis of the so-called high-energy phosphate bond present in ATP, phosphocreatine, and certain other body compounds.

phos·phate (P),

(fos'fāt),
A salt or ester of phosphoric acid. For individual phosphates not listed here, see under the name of the base.

phosphate

/phos·phate/ (fos´fāt) any salt or ester of phosphoric acid.phosphat´ic

phosphate (PO43-)

[fos′fāt]
1 an anion of phosphoric acid.
2 a salt of phosphoric acid. Phosphates are extremely important in living cells, particularly in the storage and use of energy and the transmission of genetic information within a cell and from one cell to another. See also adenosine diphosphate, adenosine triphosphate, phosphorus.

phos·phate

(fos'fāt)
1. A salt or ester (especially inorganic) of phosphoric acid.
2. The trivalent ion, PO43-.

phosphate

any salt or ester of any PHOSPHORIC ACID.

Phosphate

An organic compound necessary for mineralization of bone and other key cellular processes.
Mentioned in: Hyperparathyroidism

phosphate

any salt or ester of phosphoric acid.
1. Phosphates are widely distributed in the body, the largest amounts being in the bones and teeth. They are continually excreted in the urine and feces, and must be replaced in the diet. Inorganic phosphates function as buffer salts to maintain the acid-base balance in blood, saliva, urine and other body fluids. The principal phosphates in this buffer system are monosodium and disodium phosphate. Organic phosphates, in particular adenosine triphosphate (ATP), are used to store the chemical bond energy released during the oxidation of compounds such as glycogen or fatty acids, which may later be expended in muscle contraction. This is thought to occur through the hydrolysis of the so-called high-energy phosphate bond present in ATP, phosphocreatine and certain other body compounds. See also hypophosphatemia, hyperphosphatemia.
2. used extensively in agricultural industry as fertilizers and organic compounds as cleaning agents.

phosphate binders
usually aluminum carbonate or hydroxide preparations, used to bind phosphates and limit their absorption from the intestine. Used in the treatment of the hyperphosphatemia of renal failure.
phosphate buffer
important phosphate-containing buffers.
phosphate buffered saline
a special phosphate buffered saline used in tissue cultures and for the storage and transport of bovine embryos. Abbreviated PBS.
phosphate calculi
see struvite urolith.
dietary phosphate
supplementation of the diet with phosphate in some form is a very common practice in farm animals. Materials used include rock phosphate (defluorination may be necessary), sodium dihydrogen phosphate produced by the agricultural chemical industry, calcium triphosphate and bone meal or flour.
inorganic phosphate
any salt of phosphoric acid.
phosphate retention
a phenomenon resulting from reduced glomerular filtration; contributes to a chronic hypocalcemic state.
phosphate ridge
see mineralization front.
phosphate rock
phosphate yielding endonucleases
a class of ribonuclease involved in the usually fairly rapid turnover of RNA in the cell that degrades RNA by cleavage of the phosphodiester bonds within the molecule.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the first known occurrence in western Tennessee, macroscopic crystals of the iron phosphate mineral vivianite were discovered in some abundance on a gravel point bar along Nonconnah Creek, Shelby County, Tennessee.
The phosphate mineral was deposited over a long time window from Maestrichtian (late Cretaceous, about 80 ma), to Lutetian (early Eocene, 40 ma).
Given the high pH, Apatite is the most stable calcium phosphate mineral [16].
Here I learned of a mineral detail for my day on Jeopardy, that being that the scandium phosphate mineral, pretulite is only the sixth mineral known to contain the element scandium as a principal component.
VITOSS is a resorbable calcium phosphate scaffold that is highly porous and composed of extremely fine calcium phosphate mineral that allows for resorption, cell seeding and ingrowth of host bone.
a Canadian mining company, is involved in a phosphate mineral exploration project, 30 kilometres west of Hearst.
According to the Daily Mail, Professor Rebecca Flowers explained how the study exploited the radioactive decay of uranium and thorium atoms into helium atoms in a phosphate mineral known as apatite.
The REEs at Hoidas Lake are hosted in the phosphate mineral apatite and the silicate mineral allanite.
There was also vivianite powder, derived from an iron phosphate mineral, to be applied to the face," the paper reported.
Monazite, the original commercial rare-earth source, is a rare-earth phosphate mineral that historically has been mined from beach-sand deposits.