philosophy

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philosophy

 [fĭ-los´ŏ-fe]
a system of beliefs and principles.
concordant philosophy a philosophical system used in kinlein, concerned with the practical aspects of a person on a day to day basis; a central principle is that of cordising. See also esca.

philosophy

(fĭ-lŏs′ō-fē)
1. The love or pursuit of knowledge.
2. A culturally determined system of beliefs, concepts, theories, or convictions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bettini M (1645) Apiario universae philosophiae mathematicae.
Translations in French and other European languages have continued to make the Consolatio Philosophiae available.
36): "At ego ita me institui, ut in nullius verba iuratus, me per omnes philosophiae magistros funderem, omnes scedas excuterem, omnes familias agnoscerem.
19) Hinc Deum more philosophiae Orientalis, Cabbalisticae et Eclecticae, ex nihilo quidem creauisse mundum concedit, sed ita, ut quod in eo unum fuit, ex abysso eius infinitatis progressum se multiplex ostendat, et ideo sit, quia in eo ipso est.
In De primae philosophiae Emendatione identifiziert Leibniz beide Begriffe, GP IV.
E vero che qui per Chaucer viene soprattutto confrontato il De consolatione philosophiae di Boezio,4o opera ben nota ai poeta inglese che la tradurra integralmente.
In 1774, Benito Diaz de Gamarra published Elementa Recentioris Philosophiae, echoing the worldview of Descartes along with the science of Newton.
These dates define the period between the publication of Copernicus' De Revolutionibus and Newton's Principia Mathematica Philosophiae Naturalis.
Isaac Newton, though still strongly interested in alchemistic studies, publishes his Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica, paving the way for the modern approach to establishing knowledge about nature.
The Old English Boethius: An Edition of the Old English Versions of Boethius's "De Consolatione Philosophiae," 2 vols.
He was Georg Friedrich Poschmann (1768-1812) (Levickij 1903:371-374, Siilivask 1982:158, 162, Hiio and Piirimae 2007:177) who had obtained the degree magister philosophiae at the University of Leipzig in 1789.
Newton's three laws of motion, as first articulated in Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica (1687), form the basis for classical Newtonian mechanics and provide the relationships between forces acting on a body and the consequent motion of the body.