philosophy

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philosophy

 [fĭ-los´ŏ-fe]
a system of beliefs and principles.
concordant philosophy a philosophical system used in kinlein, concerned with the practical aspects of a person on a day to day basis; a central principle is that of cordising. See also esca.

philosophy

(fĭ-lŏs′ō-fē)
1. The love or pursuit of knowledge.
2. A culturally determined system of beliefs, concepts, theories, or convictions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Already in 1859 he obtained the degree of doctor philosophiae at the University of Berlin, then in 1866 he received the degree of magister historiae universalis at the University of Tartu.
Reluctant Gravities breaks down the traditional distinctions between poetry and prose showcased in works such as the Baghavad Gita, Boethius's De consolatione philosophiae, Thomas Traherene's Centuries of Meditations, Jean Toomer's Cane, and William Carlos Williams's Spring and All.
Newton's forthcoming book, Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica, explains how his theory accounts for the elliptical orbits of planets, the motion of comets, the occurrence of tides, and a variety of other phenomena.
Coincidently, Sir Isaac Newton also published his epic Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica in 1687.
Reviewing a new English translation of the Philosophiae Consolatio in 2003, Boethius scholar John Magee referred to the "happy partnership" that the English language has enjoyed with the Consolatio since the time of King Alfred.
14) Gia nel Sidereus nuncius, che si definisce appunto "avviso" e non "trattato", Galileo invita a condividere e partecipare delle sue scoperte "omnes verae philosophiae cupidos convocantes" ("convocando tutti gli studiosi della vera filosofia"), di cui prevede anche dubbi e reazioni: "Verum magna hic dubitatione complures affici sentio, adeoque gravi difficultate occupari" ("Qui veramente prevedo che molti saranno assaliti da grande incertezza, e impigliati in cosi grave difficolta"), ma proprio per questo li chiama a dare il loro contributo: "Astronomos omnes convocantes, ut ad illorum periodos inquirendas atque definiendas se conferant" ("Invitando tutti gli Astronomi a dedicarsi a indagare e definire i loro periodi").
His analysis of the Nine includes elements from Augustine's De Consolatione Philosophiae and the Old Norse-Icelandic legend of Piorandi, both of which bring a Christian perspective--unnecessary but not indecorous--to the examination.
4) Thirdly, Richard Weaver writes of the medieval pursuit of knowledge: "Under the world view possessed by medieval scholars, the path of learning was a path to self-depreciation, and the philosophiae doctor was one who had at length seen a rational ground for humilitas.
Rene Descartes [99, 100] expressed essentially the same ideas in his Principia Philosophiae, published in 1644 [100, p.
ego et alias creterras Athenis bibi: poeticae commentam, geometriae limpidam, musicae dulcem, dialecticae austerulam, iam uero uniuersae philosophiae inexplebilem scilicet et nectaream, 'but I have drunk other bowls at Athens: the specially made wine of poetry, the clear white of geometry, the sweet Muscat of music, the dry red of dialectics, and the never-sating nectar of universal philosophy'.