phenotype

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phenotype

 [fe´no-tīp]
1. the outward, visible expression of the hereditary constitution of an organism.
2. an individual exhibiting a certain phenotype; a trait expressed in a phenotype. adj., adj phenotyp´ic.

phe·no·type

(fē'nō-tīp),
The observable characteristics, at the physical, morphologic, or biochemical level, of an individual, as determined by the genotype and environment.
[G. phainō, to display, + typos, model]

phenotype

/phe·no·type/ (fe´nah-tīp) the entire physical, biochemical, and physiological makeup of an individual as determined both genetically and environmentally. Also, any one or any group of such traits.phenotyp´ic

phenotype

(fē′nə-tīp′)
n.
1.
a. The observable physical or biochemical characteristics of an organism, as determined by both genetic makeup and environmental influences.
b. The expression of a specific trait, such as stature or blood type, based on genetic and environmental influences.
2. An individual or group of organisms exhibiting a particular phenotype.

phe′no·typ′ic (-tĭp′ĭk), phe′no·typ′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
phe′no·typ′i·cal·ly adv.

phenotype

[fē′nətīp]
Etymology: Gk, phainein, to appear, typos, mark
1 the complete observable characteristics of an organism or group, including anatomical, physiological, biochemical, and behavioral traits, as determined by the interaction of genetic makeup and environmental factors.
2 a group of organisms that resemble each other in appearance. Compare genotype. phenotypic, adj.

phenotype

Genetics
1. Any observable or identifiable structural or functional characteristic of an organism.
2. The sum of the structural/physical and functional–biochemical, and physiologic characteristics of an organism, defined by genetics, modified by the environment. See Bombay phenotype, Mutation, Null phenotype, Para-Bombay phenotype, Swarmer cell phenotype, Trait. Cf Genotype.

phe·no·type

(fē'nō-tīp)
Manifestation of a genotype or the combined manifestation of several different genotypes. The discriminating power of the phenotype in identifying the genotype depends on its level of subtlety; thus, special methods of detecting carriers distinguish them from normal subjects from whom they are inseparable on simple physical examination. Phenotype is the immediate cause of genetic disease and object of genetic selection.
[G. phainō, to display, + typos, model]

phenotype

1. The observable appearance of an organism which is the result of the interaction of its genetic constitution and its subsequent environmental experience.
2. Any identifiable structural or functional feature of an organism. Compare GENOTYPE.

phenotype

the observable features of an individual organism that result from an interaction between the GENOTYPE and the environment in which development occurs. The interaction is that between nature and nurture. Variations due to nature are the inherited aspects of the organism, the genotype, while nurture denotes the (usually not inherited) effects of the environment upon the organism.

Sometimes two different genotypes give the same phenotype due to DOMINANCE (1) masking a recessive ALLELE. It is true to say however, that the closer we look at the effect of an allele the more likely we are to detect a special phenotype unmasked by dominance. For example, an allele may code for a nonfunctional enzyme and thus be hidden in a heterozygote (classifying the allele as recessive) but its effects may be detected by such methods as ELECTROPHORESIS, which can identify different forms of a protein.

Phenotype

1) The entire physical, biochemical, and physiologic makeup of an individual, as opposed to genotype. 2) The expression of a single gene or gene pair.

phenotype

an individual's characteristics, determined largely, but not entirely, by his/her genotype, as it can be influenced for example by environmental and maternal factors.

phenotype 

The observable characteristics (e.g. eye colour, height) of an individual that are the result of an interaction between the genes and the environment. See expressivity; genotype.

phe·no·type

(fē'nō-tīp)
Observable characteristics, at physical, morphologic, or biochemical levels of an individual.
[G. phainō, to display, + typos, model]

phenotype (fē´nōtīp),

n term referring to the expression of genotypes that can be directly distinguished (e.g., by clinical observation of external appearance or serologic tests).

phenotype

1. the outward appearance of the animal in all of its anatomical, physiological and behavioral characteristics as dictated by the genetic and environmental influences in its environment; in contradistinction to genotype in which only the inherited factors are taken into account.
2. an individual exhibiting a certain phenotype; a trait expressed in a phenotype.

Patient discussion about phenotype

Q. Can anyone with experience help me to know what the clinical phenotype of autism is? I am new to the medical field and I have been here for 3 months. Can anyone with experience help me to know what the clinical phenotype of autism is?

A. I welcome you to my favorite choice. This field is really very satisfying while we serve others for their good. Because of the similarities and differences among people with different forms of autism, health care professionals now view autism as having a broader clinical phenotype than was once thought. The expanded phenotype goes beyond the standard definition for autism, to include, as the DSM-IV states, a range of impairments rather than the absolute presence or absence of a certain behavior or symptom (DSM 1994).The DSM-IV uses the terms “pervasive developmental disorder (PDD)” and “autism spectrum disorder (ASD)” to describe five variations of autistic behavior; the International Classification of Disease (ICD), published by the World Health Organization (WHO) , has eight variations of PDD.

More discussions about phenotype
References in periodicals archive ?
GLOBAL is the largest pan-omic study combining whole genome sequencing, whole genome methylation, whole transcriptome sequencing, unbiased proteomics, metabolomics and lipidomics with coronary computed tomographic (CT) angiography, an advanced imaging technology for phenotyping, which allows the prices classification of disease in patients.
If the serum concentrations of MAT are discordant with the genotype, however, then protein phenotyping by IEF would be used as a reflex test.
A new method for fast haptoglobin phenotyping and hemoglobin binding capacity calculation based on capillary zone electrophoresis.
We believe our Nanobarcode identification tag technology is uniquely applicable for mouse phenotyping because the nanometer-scale tags allow for high level multiplexing of assays even with small volumes of mouse blood," said SurroMed CEO and Chairman Gordon Ringold, Ph.
Offering state of the art mouse model phenotyping, pharmaco-phenotyping and in vivo pharmaco-imaging, OncOptima will benefit to Biopharmaceutical and Biomedical companies by enhancing the bridging of discovery and clinical development of anti-cancer drugs.
The research will apply SurroMed's novel, integrated phenotyping platform, which incorporates proprietary advanced bioanalytical technologies for cellular, proteomic and low-molecular-weight organic molecule profiling and analysis.
PM technology is by far the most powerful and versatile cell phenotyping tool available.
Virco's VirtualPhenotype(TM) test combines the speed and genetic detail of genotyping with the predictive power of phenotyping.
For phenotyping, the healthy volunteers and patients gave informed consent and were given 300 mg of INH orally after an overnight fast.
A complete description of the rationale for this phenotyping assigiiinent is given in the Results under "Development of a LDLSF Scoring System".
Virco recently developed a new third approach to resistance testing, combining the speed and genetic detail of genotyping with the predictive simplicity and power of phenotyping -- the VirtualPhenotype(TM).
Accurate phenotyping is particularly challenging in neuropsychiatric diseases, and PrecisionMed's extensive experience in this area will be pivotal to ensuring the success of this study," said John S.