phage

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Related to Phages: Bacteriophage therapy

bacteriophage

 [bak-te´re-o-fāj″]
a virus that destroys bacteria by lysis; several varieties exist, and usually each attacks only one kind of bacteria. Certain types attach themselves to the cell membrane of the bacterium and instill a charge of DNA into the cytoplasm. DNA carries the genetic code of the virus, so that rapid multiplication of the virus takes place inside the bacterium. The growing viruses act as parasites, using the metabolism of the bacterial cell for growth and development. Eventually the bacterial cell bursts, releasing many more viruses capable of destroying similar bacteria. Called also bacterial virus. adj., adj bacteriopha´gic.

With some bacteria, notably those of the Streptococcus family, infection by certain phages can dramatically alter pathogenicity, converging previously innocuous microbes into deadly pathogenic strains. The so-called “flesh-eating” viruses are a striking example. They are relatively harmless bacteria until new geletic material is incorporated via a phage or plasmid.
temperate bacteriophage one whose genetic material (prophage) becomes an intimate part of the bacterial genome, persisting and being reproduced through many cell division cycles; the affected bacterial cell is known as a lysogenic bacterium.

bac·te·ri·o·phage

(bak-tēr'ē-ō-fāj), Avoid the mispronunciation bak-te'rē-ō-fahzh. Avoid the misspelling and mispronunciation bacterialphage.
A virus with specific affinity for bacteria. Bacteriophages have been found in association with nearly all groups of bacteria, including the Cyanobacteria; like other viruses they contain either (but never both) RNA or DNA and vary in structure from the seemingly simple filamentous bacterial virus to relatively complex forms with contractile "tails"; their relationships to the host bacteria are highly specific and, as in the case of temperate bacteriophage, may be genetically intimate. Bacteriophages are named after the bacterial species, group, or strain for which they are specific, for example, corynebacteriophage, coliphage; a number of families are recognized and have been assigned provisional names: Corticoviridae, Cystoviridae, Fuselloviridae, Inoviridae, Leviviridae, Lipothrixviridae, Microviridae, Myoviridae, Plasmaviridae, Podoviridae, Styloviridae, and Tectiviridae.
See also: coliphage.
Synonym(s): phage
[bacterio- + G. phagō, to eat]

phage

(fāj) bacteriophage.

phage

(fāj)
n.
A bacteriophage.

phage

bac·te·ri·o·phage

(bak-tēr'ē-ō-fāj)
A virus with specific affinity for bacteria. Bacteriophages have been found in essentially all groups of bacteria; like other viruses they contain either RNA or DNA (but never both) and vary in structure from simple to complex; their relationships to host bacteria are specific and may be genetically intimate. Bacteriophages are named after the bacterial species, group, or strain for which they are specific, e.g., corynebacteriophage, coliphage.
See also: coliphage
Synonym(s): phage.
[bacterio- + G. phagō, to eat]

phage

A BACTERIOPHAGE.

phage

see BACTERIOPHAGE.

bacteriophages

viruses with specific affinity for bacteria; used widely in eastern Europe as an alternative to antibiotic therapy

bac·te·ri·o·phage

(bak-tēr'ē-ō-fāj)
A virus with specific affinity for bacteria; found in essentially all groups of bacteria; like other viruses, they contain either RNA or DNA (but never both) and vary in structure from simple to complex; their relationships to host bacteria are specific and may be genetically intimate.
Synonym(s): phage.
[bacterio- + G. phagō, to eat]

phage


phage type
an intraspecies type of bacterium demonstrated by phage typing; called also lysotype and phagotype.
phage typing
characterization of bacteria, extending to strain differences, by demonstration of susceptibility to one or more (a spectrum) races of bacteriophage; widely applied to staphylococci, typhoid bacilli, etc., for epidemiological purposes.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are a few options one is that phages can attack the bacteria when it s not inside another cell, and the bacteria uses CRISPR to simply protect itself, he says.
The researchers said that the key advantage of using phages over antibiotics lies in their specificity.
We then used these pieces to identify DNA of phages that coexist with the bacteria in the gut.
Researchers, too, are looking back to the pre-antibiotic era, but with the goal of resurrecting phages as antidotes for antibiotic resistance and solving medical, agricultural, and environmental problems.
Analysis of the attP sites of CUS-1[PHI] and Ypf-[PHI] phages revealed features for direct ssDNA integration into the chromosome dimer resolution site harboured by their respective host cells (38).
Although phages were discovered nearly a century ago, Western medicine's interest in them as therapeutic agents was relatively short-lived, in part because of the eventual discovery and immediate success of antibiotics and in part because of the highly empirical and counterproductive approach that had been used by phage practitioners in the early era [16].
ARS researchers have tested a cocktail of phages on refrigerated samples of fresh-cut cantaloupe.
Intralytix isolates environmental phage viruses and selects candidates for further study.
Theoretically, these phages should target only Listeria.
The phages slipped into the brain via the olfactory bulb, which is where Alzheimer's-like plaques first appear in both people and mice.
Our team's research has demonstrated that certain phages specific for Campylobacter can significantly reduce the load of the bacteria carried by poultry.
This discovery opens the door to the therapeutic use of phages against chronic bacterial infections, both systemic and topical," said Dr.