phage

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Related to Phages: Bacteriophage therapy

bacteriophage

 [bak-te´re-o-fāj″]
a virus that destroys bacteria by lysis; several varieties exist, and usually each attacks only one kind of bacteria. Certain types attach themselves to the cell membrane of the bacterium and instill a charge of DNA into the cytoplasm. DNA carries the genetic code of the virus, so that rapid multiplication of the virus takes place inside the bacterium. The growing viruses act as parasites, using the metabolism of the bacterial cell for growth and development. Eventually the bacterial cell bursts, releasing many more viruses capable of destroying similar bacteria. Called also bacterial virus. adj., adj bacteriopha´gic.

With some bacteria, notably those of the Streptococcus family, infection by certain phages can dramatically alter pathogenicity, converging previously innocuous microbes into deadly pathogenic strains. The so-called “flesh-eating” viruses are a striking example. They are relatively harmless bacteria until new geletic material is incorporated via a phage or plasmid.
temperate bacteriophage one whose genetic material (prophage) becomes an intimate part of the bacterial genome, persisting and being reproduced through many cell division cycles; the affected bacterial cell is known as a lysogenic bacterium.

bac·te·ri·o·phage

(bak-tēr'ē-ō-fāj), Avoid the mispronunciation bak-te'rē-ō-fahzh. Avoid the misspelling and mispronunciation bacterialphage.
A virus with specific affinity for bacteria. Bacteriophages have been found in association with nearly all groups of bacteria, including the Cyanobacteria; like other viruses they contain either (but never both) RNA or DNA and vary in structure from the seemingly simple filamentous bacterial virus to relatively complex forms with contractile "tails"; their relationships to the host bacteria are highly specific and, as in the case of temperate bacteriophage, may be genetically intimate. Bacteriophages are named after the bacterial species, group, or strain for which they are specific, for example, corynebacteriophage, coliphage; a number of families are recognized and have been assigned provisional names: Corticoviridae, Cystoviridae, Fuselloviridae, Inoviridae, Leviviridae, Lipothrixviridae, Microviridae, Myoviridae, Plasmaviridae, Podoviridae, Styloviridae, and Tectiviridae.
See also: coliphage.
Synonym(s): phage
[bacterio- + G. phagō, to eat]

phage

(fāj) bacteriophage.

phage

(fāj)
n.
A bacteriophage.

phage

bac·te·ri·o·phage

(bak-tēr'ē-ō-fāj)
A virus with specific affinity for bacteria. Bacteriophages have been found in essentially all groups of bacteria; like other viruses they contain either RNA or DNA (but never both) and vary in structure from simple to complex; their relationships to host bacteria are specific and may be genetically intimate. Bacteriophages are named after the bacterial species, group, or strain for which they are specific, e.g., corynebacteriophage, coliphage.
See also: coliphage
Synonym(s): phage.
[bacterio- + G. phagō, to eat]

phage

A BACTERIOPHAGE.

phage

see BACTERIOPHAGE.

bacteriophages

viruses with specific affinity for bacteria; used widely in eastern Europe as an alternative to antibiotic therapy

bac·te·ri·o·phage

(bak-tēr'ē-ō-fāj)
A virus with specific affinity for bacteria; found in essentially all groups of bacteria; like other viruses, they contain either RNA or DNA (but never both) and vary in structure from simple to complex; their relationships to host bacteria are specific and may be genetically intimate.
Synonym(s): phage.
[bacterio- + G. phagō, to eat]

phage


phage type
an intraspecies type of bacterium demonstrated by phage typing; called also lysotype and phagotype.
phage typing
characterization of bacteria, extending to strain differences, by demonstration of susceptibility to one or more (a spectrum) races of bacteriophage; widely applied to staphylococci, typhoid bacilli, etc., for epidemiological purposes.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Food and Drug Administration and Yale University Human Investigation Committee reportedly approved the use of the phages, known as OMKO1.
Appearance of visible plaques indicated presence of specific phage.
Sensitive bacterial isolates 3Y, 2P and RP were selected as the host for the enrichment of phages SANF, SA2 and SA, respectively.
The driving force behind this project was to find phages that would kill 12 strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria that were isolated from patients," said co-author Dr.
When phages are combined with probiotics in animal models there are huge reductions in the targeted harmful bacteria with a simultaneous increase in beneficial bacteria.
Conditions for generation of stable phage lysate of Brucella S19 were optimized in our laboratory system as per Jain et al.
The plaques formed by the phages had a similar morphology: round plaques with even edges, from 0,7 to 2 mm in diameter, transparent, without secondary growth and a zone of incomplete lysis.
The goal is to develop a sustainable phage treatment that is environmentally friendly and effective.
To find out the researchers investigated the phage with electron microscopy and whole genome sequencing, finding that it does not contain
diff phages that infect clinically relevant strains of C.
The typing was done employing 23 sets of phages, in a routine test dilution (RTD) X 100.