pesticide

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pesticide

 [pes´tĭ-sīd]
a poison used to destroy pests of any sort.

pes·ti·cide

(pes'ti-sīd),
General term for an agent that destroys fungi, insects, rodents, or any other pest.

pesticide

(pĕs′tĭ-sīd′)
n.
A substance or agent used to kill pests, such as unwanted or harmful insects, rodents, or weeds.

pes′ti·cid′al (-sīd′l) adj.

pesticide

Toxicology An annihilator of ambient arachnids, antagonistic arthropods, abominable animacules or pugnacious plants–eg, fumigants, fungicides, herbicides, insecticides; most are toxic and potentially fatal, with high arsenical or organophosphate content, and store in adipose tissue, given their lipid solubility Types Organochlorines-eg, DDT, chlordane, mirex, organophosphates–eg, parathion, diazinon, carbamates–eg, Aldicarb, carbaryl, carbofuran, metals–eg, copper, tributyl-tin oxide, pyrethroids–eg, permethrin, cypermethrin, etc–eg, 2,4-D, atrazine, paraquat. See Intermediate syndrome, Organophosphate pesticide.

pes·ti·cide

(pes'ti-sīd)
General term for an agent that destroys fungi, insects, rodents, or any other pest.

pesticide

any agent that causes the death of a pest. The general definition is usually restricted to chemicals with pesticidal properties, such as herbicides, insecticides, acaricides and fungicides. Pesticide application can produce many problems, for example:
  1. (a) destruction of organisms useful to man (‘nontarget’ species).
  2. (b) directly harmful effects to man if used incorrectly
  3. (c) accumulation and concentration in food chains leading to toxicity in animals at a higher TROPHIC LEVEL.

pesticide

a poison used to destroy pests of any sort. See arsenical, carbamates, chlorinated hydrocarbons, organophosphorus compound, pyrethroids.

pesticide poisoning
pesticides are selective poisons chosen for use because of their relative safety for humans and animals. It is likely that they will poison these species if they are used in sufficient quantity or in special circumstances, for example when the water intake of the subject animals is limited.
pesticide resistance
continued use of a single agent, or a group of closely allied agents, can cause selective survival of insects with innate tolerance of the agent and lead to the development of a resistant population.
pesticide tissue residues
some pesticides have had to be withdrawn from use because of their persistence in the tissues of animals including humans. The passage of the agent in the milk of the animal is a comparable problem.
References in periodicals archive ?
It recommends in those states with legalization the adoption of laws governing cannabis production that prohibit federally registered pesticides and require the adoption of organic practices that only allow products exempt from registration based on the full range of possible exposure patterns.
The pesticide recommendations made by state agriculture universities, agriculture departments and other boards for a crop do not match those pesticides registered with CIBRC, CSE has found.
children continue to be exposed to pesticides that are known to be harmful in places they live, learn and play.
Croplife closed down 400 Chinese factories producing illegal pesticides, he said.
The educational material includes topics such as what is a pesticide, pesticide drift, children's safety, pesticides and pregnancy, how to read pesticide labels and how to avoid exposure.
of the potenially harmful effects of exposure to pesticides
Organic diets significantly lower children's dietary exposure to arganophosphorus pesticides.
Because these pesticides don't readily dissolve, but instead glom on to particles and quickly settle out of water, his team focused its analyses on sediments.
To the dismay of Beyond Pesticides, penta's revised risk assessment neglects to take into account two highly hazardous constitutents: dioxins and hexachlorobenzene (HCB).
The lawsuit was filed in federal court in San Francisco on Tuesday, alleging that the EPA ignored scientific evidence that children who grow up near farms face increased health risks from exposure to pesticides from air, soil, water, food and clothing.
Initially, the pesticides worked well and several pesticide shops opened in the nearby town, where farmers could buy on credit.
Pesticides are intended to kill or control pests, but many are highly toxic to organisms other than those targeted.

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