pest

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plague

(plāg),
1. Any disease of wide prevalence or of excessive mortality.
2. An acute infectious disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis and marked clinically by high fever, toxemia, prostration, a petechial eruption, lymph node enlargement, pneumonia, or hemorrhage from the mucous membranes; primarily a disease of rodents, transmitted to humans by fleas that have bitten infected animals. In humans the disease takes one of four clinical forms: bubonic plague, septicemic plague, pneumonic plague, or ambulant plague Synonym(s): pest, pestilence (1) , pestis
[G. plege, a stroke, a wound; L. plaga, a stroke, injury]

pest

(pĕst)
n.
1. An organism, typically an insect, that sickens or annoys humans, hampers human activities, damages crops or food products, harms livestock, or causes damage to buildings.
2. A deadly epidemic disease; a pestilence.

pest

Medical history
Plague, pestilence.
 
Medspeak
A nonspecific term for any undesirable animal or insect.
 
Vox populi
An annoying, irritating person.

PEST

Abbreviation for:
political, economic, social and technological

pest

any organism that causes nuisance to man, either economically or medically. Our classification of pests is constantly changing and is very dependent on economic circumstances. For example, the fungus causing apple scab is treated as a pest in the UK because it disfigures the fruit. In poorer countries, however, such cosmetic qualities of apples are less important and the fungus is not considered a pest.

pest

1. an organism that injures, irritates or damages livestock or crops.
2. a highly fatal, rapidly spreading disease with an acute course. See also plague, peste des petits ruminants, peste du porc, peste suina.

fowl pest
see avian influenza. Newcastle disease was at one time known as new fowl pest and as pseudo fowl pest.
integrated pest management
the use of all suitable methods of pest (insect, weed, rodent, etc) control to keep populations below the economic injury level. Methods include farming practices and the use of biological, physical and genetic control agents and selective use of pesticides.