hip fracture

(redirected from Pertrochanteric)

hip fracture

vernacular term for fracture of the femoral neck, typically resulting from a fall in an old person with osteoporosis; more common in women; requires surgical repair with internal fixation and can lead to prolonged or permanent loss of mobility and shortened life span.

hip fracture

Orthopedic surgery A femoral fracture which affects 1/6 white ♀–US during life Epidemiology 250,000/yr–US Specifics Proximal femur; 90+% femoral neck, intertrochanteric; 5-10% are subtrochanteric Risk factors Tall, thin ♀, osteoporosis, previous Fx or stroke, white, use of walking aids, alcohol consumption, poor health, sedentary lifestyle, Rx with benzodiazepines, anticonvulsants; HRT may protect ♀ < age 75, institutional residence, visual impairment, dementia Diagnosis Hx, plain AP film, MRI, 99mTc bone scan. See Falls, Total hip replacement.

hip frac·ture

(hip frak'shŭr)
Vernacular term for fracture of the femoral neck, typically resulting from a fall in an old person with osteoporosis; more common in women; requires surgical repair with internal fixation and can lead to prolonged or permanent loss of mobility and shortened life span.

hip fracture

A fracture of the proximal portion of the femur, i.e., of either the head, neck, intertrochanteric or subtrochanteric regions of the hip. Hip fracture occurs each year in approximately 225,000 Americans over 50. It is more common in women than in men due to osteoporosis and is esp. common in slender, elderly women. Mortality rates after hip fracture are influenced by the patient's age, general physical health, and the type of fracture.

Etiology

Osteoporosis predisposes an elderly person to hip fracture.

Symptoms

Pain in the knee or groin is the classic presenting sign of a hip fracture. If the femur is displaced, shortening and rotation of the leg may be present.

Treatment

Preoperatively, Buck's traction may be used in the short term to alleviate muscle spasms. An open reduction is the preferred surgical treatment. A femoral prosthesis may be used for femoral neck or head fractures. The bone takes 6 to 12 weeks to heal in an elderly patient.

Patient care

During hospitalization, general patient care concerns apply. The patient is prepared physically and emotionally for surgery according to the orthopedic surgeon's protocol, and postsurgical care and pain control (epidural or intravenous patient-controlled analgesia [PCA]) is discussed. Neurovascular status of the affected limb is assessed according to protocol and compared to the unaffected limb. The patient is referred for physical and occupational therapy and uses a walker until the bone is completely healed. Prevention and relief of pain and monitoring of postoperative complications, including infection, hip dislocation, and deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, are primary concerns. Use of an incentive spirometer is encouraged to prevent atelectasis and respiratory complications. Prophylactic antibiotics and anticoagulants are administered as prescribed, and hip precautions are implemented to prevent dislocation. These precautions include having the patient avoid hip adduction (usually by an abductor wedge), rotation, and flexion greater than 90° during transfer and ambulation activities, and by using a raised toilet seat and semi-reclining chair. The patient is typically hospitalized for 2 to 4 days and then discharged to a nursing home, subacute unit, transitional care unit, rehabilitation center, or home for rehabilitation for several weeks.

See also: fracture
References in periodicals archive ?
We also include a binary variable that differentiates patients with a femoral neck fracture and a pertrochanteric fracture.
20 Makinen et al suggested that arthroplasty for unstable pertrochanteric fractures has therefore been considered as an alternative primary treatment option.
Osteoporotic pertrochanteric fracture: management and current controversies.
The pertrochanteric external fixator reduced pain, hospital stay, and mechanical complications in comparison with the sliding hip screw.
In March 2012, a healthy 50-year-old Caucasian male sustained a traumatic bifocal pertrochanteric and distal third shaft fracture of the left femur that was treated by another surgeon with a cephalomedullary long nail distally fixed with 2 screws.
A1: Simple (2-fragment) Pertrochanteric Area Fractures A1.
This represented all hip fracture patients, including femoral neck and pertrochanteric fractures.
It is used in traumatology, for contralateral percutaneous internal fixation of proximal femur, in patient with a low energy pertrochanteric fracture on the first side.
Reasons for interventions other than the first- or second-stage procedures have been classified into the following subgroups: early soft tissue infection, late infection of soft tissue and/or bone, structural failure of the implant, and periprosthetic or pertrochanteric fractures (Table 2).
The criteria for case selection were severe osteoporosis patients with fracture of the hip, Garden IV neck fractures or pertrochanteric fractures Kyle III or IV.
The trochanteric fractures are subdivided in three types: pertrochanteric simple (Type A1) (fig.
Influence of Fracture Stability on Early Patient Mortality and Reoperation After Pertrochanteric and Intertrochanteric Hip Fractures.