Perthes' disease


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osteochondrosis

 [os″te-o-kon-dro´sis]
a disease of the growth ossification centers in children, beginning as a degeneration or necrosis followed by regeneration or recalcification; known by various names, depending on the bone involved.
osteochondrosis defor´mans ti´biae tibia vara.

Perthes' disease

Inflammation at the growing upper end (EPIPHYSIS) of the thigh bone (femur) probably due to interference with the blood supply in the area. Perthes' disease is commonest in children and causes pain in the thigh and groin, limping and restriction of movement at the hip joint. Treatment is by rest and splinting and occasionally surgery. (Georg Clemen Perthes, 1869–1927 German surgeon).

Perthes' disease

avascular degeneration of the upper femoral epiphysis. Occurs in children aged 4-8, five times more commonly in boys, causing a limp, which may be painless. Revascularization occurs but residual deformity of the femoral head may subsequently lead to arthritic changes. Diagnosed on clinical suspicion with X-ray confirmation. Treatment aims to minimize the deformity and includes rest, traction, plaster cast or occasionally surgery (described in 1910 by German orthopaedic surgeon G. C. Perthes).

Perthes' disease

References in periodicals archive ?
Effect of prophylactic trochanteric epiphyseodesis in older children with Perthes' disease.
Hip pain during adolescence after Perthes' disease, J Bone Joint Surg Br, 1981;63B(4):572-4.
When a child is diagnosed with Perthes' disease it can be devastating for the whole family, however Nick's determination just shows that there is light at the end of the tunnel.
Deborah says that while Perthes' disease is not rare, she'd never heard of it until Nick was diagnosed.
About one in 10,000 children between the ages of two and 15 years develop Perthes' disease each year.
A GP will normally refer a child with suspected Perthes' disease to a specialist.