persuasion

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per·sua·sion

(per-swā'zhŭn),
The act of influencing the mind of another, by authority, argument, reason, or personal insight; an important element in most types of psychotherapy.
[L. persuasio, fr. persuadeo, to persuade]

persuasion

(pĕr-swā′zhŭn)
The act of influencing the thinking or behavior of others.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Course of True Love Never Did Run Smooth: Shakespearian Comedy in Emma" Persuasions On-Line 26.
Against its lively, comic, optimistic tale of a young woman's moral growth, Emma counterpoints a somber vision of the vulnerability of our lives that anticipates Persuasion.
The explanation for the higher persuasion level for the gain frame in credit card advertising studies, comparing to the loss frame, could be found on intuitive reactions (System 1 (2)).
Would intuition affect persuasion levels in goal framing studies, when service's relevance or importance to the consumer are being assessed?
Preservice teachers were provided with two sources of efficacy: vicarious experiences and verbal persuasion.
Applied to the teaching process among the sources of efficacy identified by Bandura (1977, 1997), vicarious experiences (observing others teach) and verbal persuasion (intellectual resources) do not require direct teaching experience.
The task at hand, of course, is to plan an evening that satisfies both persuasions, for naturally, if you're the ritualistic type, your spouse or lover or best chum or child recommends that you make it an early night for New Year's.
31 sets the tone for the next 365 days, those of the ritualistic persuasion believe in celebrating their brains out on New Year's Eve.
The essays offered here in Persuasions continue tire dialogue about reading and meaning in our busy, complicated, angst-filled existences.
And I hope you will find special pleasure in the essays in this issue of Persuasions.
What a marvelous way to celebrate the 25th anniversary of JASNA and Persuasions.
However, in Persuasion, Austen appears to have abandoned dance and relegated Anne Elliot to the status of "heroine without a ball.