personality test

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Related to Personality testing: MMPI, Psychological testing

per·son·al·i·ty test

any of the category of psychological tests designed to test the characteristics of the personality, emotional status, mental disorder, etc., in contrast to an intelligence test.

personality test

n.
A test, usually involving a standardized series of questions or tasks, used to describe or evaluate a subject's personality characteristics. Also called personality inventory.

personality test

any of a variety of standardized tests used in the evaluation or assessment of various facets of personality structure, emotional status, and behavioral traits. Compare achievement test, aptitude test, intelligence test, psychological test. See also Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory.

personality test

Psychology Any psychological test–eg, Rorschach ink-blot test or multiple choice California Psychological Inventory–designed to objectively measure certain facets of a person's personality and possibly predict the ability to function in the workplace; some experts believe that PTs are of little use and poorly predictive of future behavior; Cf IQ test.

per·son·al·i·ty test

(pĕrsŏn-ali-tē test)
Form of psychological assessment designed to test characteristics of personality, emotional status, mental disorder.
References in periodicals archive ?
But to suggest that "the policing of teacher personality" stemmed solely from educational progressivism is to obscure the more complex origins and outcomes of personality testing in modern American life.
Considerable evidence points to the benefits of using personality testing in military recruitment and job placement.
on the extent of their use of traditional selection techniques and use (if any) of online personality testing for selection and hiring purposes.
More dating agencies are also starting to use personality testing as a way of matching people together.
However, as a result of varying interpretations of the success and failures of personality testing, the pro-testing school seems to have split into progressive and conservative wings.
Personality testing is the more glamorous and ephemeral area of psychological testing, but the intuitively appealing nature of the concepts does not guarantee that they are inherently correct.
The results for sales occupations demonstrate clearly why earlier reviews of the literature were so pessimistic about the role of personality testing in sales selection.
In Canada, personality testing has not yet been the subject of significant litigation.
Currently, carriers perform personality testing to determine an individual's ability to sell.
The last step should be personality testing to determine the candidate's fit with the position and to assess strengths and weaknesses.