peripatetic

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Related to Peripatetics: Peripateticism, Aristotelian

per·i·pa·tet·ic

(per'i-pă-tet'ik),
1. Walking around; formerly used to describe a patient with "walking" (i.e., mild) typhoid fever.
2. Relating to a disease imported to a nonendemic area by a host clinically unaffected during the transport phase.
[G. peripatēsis, a walking about]

peripatetic

[-pətet′ik]
Etymology: Gk, peripatein, to walk about
pertaining to an ambulatory typhoid patient.

peripatetic

As used in UK healthcare groups, a term referring to resources or services which are flexible and can be deployed where and when needed, rather than from one fixed place.

per·i·pa·tet·ic

(per'i-pă-tet'ik)
1. Walking around.
2. Relating to a disease imported to a nonendemic area by a host clinically unaffected during the transport phase.
[G. peripatēsis, a walking about]
References in periodicals archive ?
Like the Friends in Council, the Peripatetics discussed religion, philosophy and history.
Stoneman 2003:328-338, but see also Scardigli 1995:7-12 on peripatetic influence on Plutarch.
As has been seen, the Peripatetics did not believe in the real efficacy of prayers and sacrifices, although they conformed outwardly to public worship (Chadwick 1980:449).
Edwards, who follows Dorrie ("Ammonius, Teacher of Origen," Journal of Ecclesiastical History 44:2 [April 1993]: 169181), identifies the Ammonius who taught Origen with an otherwise unknown Alexandria Peripatetic named in Vit.
And it is not simply walking; it is walking together and talking with one's fellow peripatetic students.
As in De malo, Thomas relies on the Stoic/ Peripatetic debate to assert the possibility of reasonable anger, and claims that the Lord is only condemning anger that is not reasonable.
Contemporary natural scientists would surely dispute Aristotle's knowledge of the biological and astronomical topics to which Lucian refers, but the founder of the so-called Peripatetic school distinguished himself from his contemporaries with his detailed observations and taxonomies of the physical world.
At a crossroads in the New Europe, while America's war on Iraq burns into consciousness, Adnan--a Lebanese, educated at the Sorbonne just after the world war, living outside the war ruins of Beruit, between Paris and California--finds a fiction of the writing table, of the peripatetics of the writer's thought.
Nichimura does not define "twentieth-century" in her introduction and while the majority of entrants were born after 1900, the inclusion of some composers with birth dates ranging from 1874 to the close of the nineteenth century (including Arnold Schoenberg, John Ireland, Igor Stravinsky, and Edgard Varese) causes one to wonder whether, say, George Enescu (born 1881) and Bohuslav Martinu (born 1890)--two gregarious peripatetics who had many opportunities to be interviewed--were erroneously omitted or whether there are no published interviews extant.
Cosnay wagers on indirection, and we readers must engage in peripatetics similar to those of Helen herself, as we, too, look for truth (or some semblance thereof).