pedicle

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pedicle

 [ped´ĭ-k'l]
a footlike, stemlike, or narrow basal part or structure, such as a narrow strip by which a graft of tissue remains attached to the donor site.
pedicle of vertebral arch one of the paired parts of the vertebral arch that connect a lamina to the vertebral body.

ped·i·cle

(ped'ĭ-kĕl), [TA] Do not confuse this word with pedicel.
1. A constricted portion or stalk. Synonym(s): pediculus (1) [TA]
2. A stalk by which a nonsessile tumor is attached to normal tissue. Synonym(s): pedunculus [TA], peduncle (2)
3. A stalk through which a flap of tissue is vascularized, permitting transfer to another site.
[L. pediculus, dim. of pes, foot]

pedicle

/ped·i·cle/ (ped´ĭ-k'l) a footlike, stemlike, or narrow basal part or structure.

pedicle

(pĕd′ĭ-kəl)
n.
1. Biology A small stalk or stalklike structure, especially one supporting or connecting an organ or other body part. Also called pedicel.
2. Medicine
a. A slender footlike or stemlike part, as at the base of a tumor.
b. Part of a skin or tissue graft that is left temporarily attached to the original site.

pedicle

Etymology: L, pediculus, little foot
a narrow stalk, stem, or tube of tissue attached to a tumor, skin flap, bone, or organ.

ped·i·cle

(ped'i-kĕl) [TA]
1. A constricted portion or stalk.
Synonym(s): pediculus (1) .
2. A stalk by which a nonsessile tumor is attached to normal tissue.
Synonym(s): peduncle (2) , pedunculus.
3. A stalk through which a flap receives nourishment until its transfer to another site results in the nourishment coming from that site.
[L. pediculus, dim. of pes, foot]

pedicle

stalk

pedicle

a footlike, stemlike, or narrow basal part or structure, such as a narrow strip by which a graft of tissue remains attached to the donor site.

pedicle advancement technique
a surgical technique, commonly used in the repair of skin defects and defects in eyelids, in which a pedicle of tissue, usually skin, is formed and moved forward to fill a defect, without lateral movement. Various forms include the single or sliding flap, bipedicle flap, and V-Y technique. See also flap (1).
pedicle flap
see pedicle graft.
omental pedicle flap
a segment of omentum can be mobilized as a flap to aid in the reconstruction of the thoracic or body wall.
vertebral pedicle
one of the paired parts of the vertebral arch that connect a lamina to the vertebral body.
References in periodicals archive ?
The market for pedicle screw-based stabilization devices has been growing in recent years due to the prevalence of spine instabilities and deformities as well as the increasing number of surgeons being trained in pedicle screw-based technologies.
The criticality of pedicle screw placement has been highlighted by published reports showing that high rates of misplacements can lead to such serious complications as quadriplegia.
However, to the best of the authors' knowledge no previous research has been done for establishing a finite element model of the interface between bone and pedicle screw inserted at different angles.
The pedicle screw was modelled simplified, as a cylinder.
Pedicle screw fixation brought the earliest fusion of the fractured pedicles, although whether it provides anterior stability can be questioned.
1-5) However, a renewed interest in this lesion has arisen from a similar lesion seen as a result of traumatic accidents, and reports of both pedicle fractures of the axis secondary to automobile accidents appeared in the literature in the 1950s and 1960s.
The agency did, however, grant some investigational device exemptions for clinical testing of pedicle fixation systems (involving about 6,120 patients), but it refused to approve spinal screws except in those limited experiments.
Manufacturers nonetheless proceeded to advertise the pedicle systems, recruit doctors into training programs, and contribute anecdotal reports to the medical literature about successful experiences.
Moreover, the diameter of the pedicle screw and its length can be chosen based on the smallest cross section of the pedicle (isthmus) available from the 3D model of the vertebra, as will be detailed further.
In terms of effectiveness in achieving fusion, spondylolisthesis patients receiving treatment with bone screws in their spinal pedicles had a success rate of 89.
Accuracy of pedicle screw placement is still an issue in spine surgery: published rates of intraoperatively "misplaced" pedicle screws range from 10 to 40 percent, some of which result in pathological consequences such as spinal cord damage, including paraplegia or tetraplegia.
Regardless of whether spine surgeons use a straight- or curved-tip pedicle placement probe, pedicle screws placed with conventional probes show high rates of misplacements that can lead to a number of serious complications for patients, including nerve injury and even quadriplegia.