poverty

(redirected from Paupers)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

pov·er·ty

peniaphobia.

poverty

[pov′ərtē]
Etymology: L, paupertas
1 a lack of material wealth needed to maintain existence.
2 a loss of emotional capacity to feel love or sympathy.

poverty

The state of being deprived of the essentials of well-being, such as adequate housing, food, sufficient income, employment, access to required social services and social status. The most commonly used threshold of low income in the UK is a household income that is ≤ 60% of the average (median) British household income. In 2008/9, poverty was defined in terms of the amount of money left after income tax, council tax and housing costs (rent, mortgage interest, buildings insurance and water charges) have been deducted: £119 per week for single adult with no dependent children and £288 per week for a couple with two dependent children under 14. These sums of money represent what the household has left to spend on food, heating, travel, entertainment, and any needs or wants. In 2008/09, 13 million people in the UK were living in households below this low-income threshold—i.e., 22% of the population—compared 12 million at that level in 2004/05.

poverty

(pov′ĕrt-ē) [Fr. poverté, fr L. paupertas]
The condition of having an inadequate supply of money, resources, or means of subsistence. In 2010 in the U.S., for example, a family of four earning less than $22,000 was considered to live in poverty.

poverty of thought

The mental state of being devoid of thought and having a feeling of emptiness.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pauper Capital enhances their findings showing that London saw much higher costs of per capita poor relief mainly because of its heavy use of workhouses.
29) (Boys occasionally rioted, but they tended more to destroy property or abscond; adult paupers occasionally rioted as well.
By 1844 there were about 1,600 patients in East London in privately-run houses for pauper lunatics paid for by the parishes from poor relief, and 200-300 more in `private paying customer' establishments.
This study shows that after 1844 a better regulated system was accepted despite the Commissioners' desire to abolish the apprenticeship of pauper children.
Paupers belong to the category of the unfit, and certain social theorists of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries held that it would be better for paupers to perish and decrease the surplus population.
The demand for public poor relief is p - d(X, e), where p is the incidence of public pauperism (for example, the number of paupers per 1,000 population); X is a set of exogenous variables that shift the demand for relief; and e is the "generosity" of relief, assumed to be measured by expenditures per recipient.
Less-eligibility led to the workhouse principle, the idea that to get relief, the able-bodied pauper and his family (but not the sick, the aged, and widows with small children) would have to live in workhouses.
Not exactly how it's described in another version when "the paupers, bold as brass, say you can keep your Christmas pudding, and stick it up yer.
Chapter 7 examines the skills acquired by factory apprentices and education provided by manufacturers and parishes, suggesting that child paupers were better PrePared for a career in manufacturing than commonly assumed.
I am not saying they should all be paupers, but they could still live very comfortably and give a lot of it away.
Ideologues often claimed that the old poor law inculcated a "slave" mentality into paupers who regarded support of their families as a right which the parish owed them, rather than a responsibility which spurred them to work hard and deterred rebellious behavior.