poverty

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pov·er·ty

peniaphobia.

poverty

[pov′ərtē]
Etymology: L, paupertas
1 a lack of material wealth needed to maintain existence.
2 a loss of emotional capacity to feel love or sympathy.

poverty

The state of being deprived of the essentials of well-being, such as adequate housing, food, sufficient income, employment, access to required social services and social status. The most commonly used threshold of low income in the UK is a household income that is ≤ 60% of the average (median) British household income. In 2008/9, poverty was defined in terms of the amount of money left after income tax, council tax and housing costs (rent, mortgage interest, buildings insurance and water charges) have been deducted: £119 per week for single adult with no dependent children and £288 per week for a couple with two dependent children under 14. These sums of money represent what the household has left to spend on food, heating, travel, entertainment, and any needs or wants. In 2008/09, 13 million people in the UK were living in households below this low-income threshold—i.e., 22% of the population—compared 12 million at that level in 2004/05.

poverty

(pov′ĕrt-ē) [Fr. poverté, fr L. paupertas]
The condition of having an inadequate supply of money, resources, or means of subsistence. In 2010 in the U.S., for example, a family of four earning less than $22,000 was considered to live in poverty.

poverty of thought

The mental state of being devoid of thought and having a feeling of emptiness.
References in periodicals archive ?
Green explores removals, by which paupers could be passed to their home parishes.
The Pauper Memorial, believed to be the first of its kind in the UK, will ensure that 2,500 people buried at Heath Lane Cemetery are not forgotten.
8) However, Catholic guardians contended for influence as well, sometimes speaking up for Catholic paupers to ensure the consolations of the provision of mass and the services of a priest.
I don't believe God calls us to live as paupers or necessarily give away all we have.
The names of 7,500 paupers who were buried in unmarked graves in the British port of Liverpool over 150 years ago were read out at a recent service of remembrance and reconciliation.
Monks, nobles, and wealthy people would wash the feet of paupers and invite them to dine.
The first three chapters tell the stories of London's black paupers and the servants of sophisticated English ladies and gentlemen.
They wanted those who could be poor and independent not to turn into paupers, that is, people who were permanently dependent on others for their daily sustenance.
The Guardians with their Ladies, although the wind is east, have come in their furs and wrappers, to watch the paupers eat.
Also, the origins and subsequent fate of apprentices should be studied to contextualize these placements within the life-course of paupers.
We know that more than 2,500 paupers were buried at Heath Lane, in many cases 20 deep in mass graves.