Pauli exclusion principle

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Paul·i exclusion prin·ci·ple

(paw'lē),
the theory limiting the number of electrons in the orbit or shell of an atom; that it is not possible for any two electrons to have all four quantum numbers identical.

Paul·i ex·clu·sion prin·ci·ple

(pawl'ē eks-klū'zhŭn prin'si-pĕl)
The theory limiting the number of electrons in the orbit or shell of an atom: that it is not possible for any two electrons to have all four quantum numbers identical.

Pauli,

Wolfgang, Austrian-U.S. physicist and Nobel laureate, 1900-1958.
Pauli exclusion principle - the theory limiting the number of electrons in the orbit or shell of an atom.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Relying on this nuclear physics example, one deduces that the Pauli exclusion principle is completely consistent with three identical fermions in a [J.
Like all members of the decuplet, the states of these baryons abide by the Pauli exclusion principle.
In the following sub-sections, three areas are discussed: The Pauli exclusion principle, chemical reactivity and chemical bonds.
The Pauli Exclusion Principle is an extremely important principle in science [10].
The repulsive core is attributed to the Pauli Exclusion Principle and Gillespie explains this as follows [12, see p.
In the way they build the superstructures of atoms and in the way they prevent atoms from collapsing, electrons obey a rule called the Pauli exclusion principle.