patient

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Related to Patients: patience

patient

 [pa´shent]
a person who is ill or is undergoing treatment for disease. There is considerable debate regarding the appropriate use of this term. In some institutional settings it is not used because it is thought to denote a dependent relationship on the part of the person undergoing treatment. The words client, resident, and at times guest can also be used to refer to a person receiving treatment.
p's rights those rights attributed to a person seeking health care. In 1973 the American Hospital Association approved a statement called the “Patient's Bill of Rights,” regarding a patient's rights during hospitalization. (A revised document was subsequently approved in 1992.) This was published with the expectation that observance of patient's rights would contribute to more effective care and greater satisfaction for the patient, health care providers, and the hospital organization in general. Although it is recognized that a personal relationship between the health care provider and the patient is essential for provision of care, legal precedent has established that the hospital itself also has a responsibility to the patient.

In general, the rights of a patient are concerned with the patient being fully informed about his or her illness, the diagnostic and therapeutic measures anticipated, and the written records of the care received. The patient has the right to considerate and respectful care, delivered in response to a request for services and in a manner that provides continuity of care. In regard to payment for services, the patient has the right to examine and receive an explanation of the bill regardless of source of payment.

pa·tient

(pā'shĕnt),
One who is suffering from any disease or behavioral disorder and is under treatment for it. Compare: case.
[L. patiens, pres. p. of patior, to suffer]

patient

(pā′shənt)
adj.
Bearing or enduring pain, difficulty, provocation, or annoyance with calmness.
n.
One who receives medical attention, care, or treatment.

pa′tient·ly adv.

patient (pt.)

[pā′shənt]
Etymology: L, pati, to suffer
1 a recipient of a health care service.
2 a health care recipient who is ill or hospitalized.
3 a client in a health care service.

patient

EBM
A person with a  medical condition who participates in a clinical trial. Often used synonymously with subject, though not all subjects in a clinical trial are patients (may also include healthy volunteers).

Medspeak
A person under a physician's care for a particular disease or condition.

patient

Medtalk A person receiving health care. See Crossover patient, Difficult patient, Expectant patient, Good patient, Index patient, Negative patient, Noncompliant patient, Orphan patient, Outpatient, Private patient, Problem patient, Professional patient, Qualified patient, Qualifying patient, Service patient, Standardized patient, Violent/combative patient, Wandering patient.

pa·tient

(pā'shĕnt)
One who is suffering from disease, injury, an abnormal state, or a mental disorder, and is engaged in related treatment.
Compare: case (1) , client
[L. patiens, pres. p. of patior, to suffer]

patient 

Term originating from the Latin patior meaning to suffer; one who suffers or is ill and requires treatment.

pa·tient

(pā'shĕnt)
Any person suffering from any disease or behavioral disorder and undergoing treatment for it.
Compare: case
[L. patiens, pres. p. of patior, to suffer]

patient,

n a person under medical or dental care.
patient admission,
n the formal acceptance of a patient for care into a clinic, hospital, or extended care facility.
patient, bedridden (homebound),
n an individual from any age group confined to a private home, hospital, skilled nursing facility, hospice, nursing home, or institution.
patient compliance,
n the degree or extent to which a patient follows or completes a prescribed diagnostic, treatment, or preventive procedure.
patient education,
n the process of informing a patient about a health matter to secure informed consent, patient cooperation, and a high level of patient compliance.
patient load,
n the number of patients treated by a dental professional or a group of dental professionals within a specified period.
patient satisfaction,
n the perception of the patient(s) of one or more aspects of a dental care system; an outcome measure of quality.
patient transfer,
n to convey the responsibility for the care of a patient from one entity to another. It may involve the discharge from one entity and the admission to another along with the patient's medical/dental records or copies.

patient

an animal that is ill or is undergoing treatment for disease.

patient data
name, initials, sex, address, postcode, phone number.
patient monitoring
continuous or frequent periodic clinical assessment.
patient rights
are adapted from the statement applicable to human medicine. They are really only applicable to the client in the veterinary situation. See client rights.

Patient discussion about patient

Q. Over-medication” for bipolar patients. Does anyone have any information on “over-medication” for bipolar patients? About any societies that is overdependence on drugs or medicines to treat bipolar disorder?

A. pharmaceutical drugs can be of great help when the disease breaks out. but in the moment that the person is again under control, you should find out the causes and cure them one after another. psychosis, schizophrenia, paranoia break out, because your emotional body can't keep all traumata anymore under control. the last body - the physical body will react out of control because too many emotions have not been assimilated in time. kineology is here of great help to analyse and eliminate one cause after another. detoxication is another thing which must be considered. healthy food - biological food, source water (still water) - each case needs individual help.

Q. how long is a patient diagnosed with diverticulitis stay in the hospital How long is the observation period a patient diagnosed with diverticulitis

A. Simple diverticulitis may be treated as outpatient without hospitalization. Complicated cases are usually admitted and treated with antibiotics for several days.

You may read more here:
www.nlm.nih.gov/MEDLINEPLUS/ency/article/000257.htm

Q. I need to know when do the patient require hospitalization for bipolar? Hello everyone, I need to know when do the patient require hospitalization for bipolar and what are the factors decide on the duration of their stay?

A. There are many factors that can lead to hospitalization. It can be simply that the patient needs to be monitored while their medications are tweaked. It may be because the patient is in risk of harming themselves, or someone else. It may be that the patient is manic to a point where they may harm themselves. The stay in the hospital will also very depending on their symptoms and how quickly they can be controlled with medications and theropy. Sometimes a hospital stay could be very good for the patient and has often been a factor in saving lives.

More discussions about patient
References in classic literature ?
Such were the singular circumstances in connection with the Resident Patient and the Brook Street Doctor.
No patient will like it-- certainly not Peacock's, who have been used to depletion.
The eloquent auctioneer was seized with pneumonia, and having been a patient of Mr.
Trumbull rose from his couch with a disposition to speak of an illness in which he had manifested the strength of his mind as well as constitution; and he was not backward in awarding credit to the medical man who had discerned the quality of patient he had to deal with.
John Long, "noblemen and gentlemen" attesting his extraction of a fluid like mercury from the temples of a patient.
Rubelle looked very attentively at the patient, curtseyed to Lady Glyde, set one or two little things right in the room, and sat down quietly in a corner to wait until she was wanted.
As soon as he set eyes on his patient I saw his face alter.
The Countess, on her own responsibility, immediately brought him in to see the patient.
After giving us some useful directions about the management of the patient, and mentioning that he would come again in five days' time, the physician withdrew to consult in private with Mr.
Dawson, now that his patient was safe, was less inclined than ever to submit to unprofessional interference, and the Count (I cannot imagine why) lost all the self-control which he had so judiciously preserved on former occasions, and taunted the doctor, over and over again, with his mistake about the fever when it changed to typhus.
In the meanwhile we had the Count to consult in any minor difficulty, and we need not unnecessarily disturb our patient in her present weak and nervous condition by the presence of a stranger at her bedside.
The prevalence of hearing loss in hemodialysis-treated patients has been reported to range between 15 and 54%.

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