narcissistic personality disorder

(redirected from Pathological narcissism)
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narcissistic personality disorder

 
a personality disorder marked by a grandiose sense of self-importance. Patients are preoccupied with fantasies of unlimited success, power, brilliance, beauty, or ideal love. In spite of these fantasies, they are troubled by a sense of inadequacy and respond to criticism, defeat, or rejection either by indifference or by feelings of rage, shame, humiliation, or emptiness. Their relationships with others are disturbed by expectations of special favors, exploitativeness, overidealization and devaluation of others, and a lack of empathy.

nar·cis·sis·tic per·son·al·i·ty dis·or·der

1. a pervasive pattern in adulthood of self-centeredness, self-importance, lack of empathy for others, sense of entitlement, and viewing others largely as objects to meet one's needs, manifested in a variety of contexts.
2. a DSM diagnosis that is established when the specified criteria are met. Compare: autosynnoia.

narcissistic personality disorder

narcissistic personality disorder

[när′sisis′tik]
a psychiatric diagnosis characterized by an exaggerated sense of self-importance and uniqueness, an abnormal need for attention and admiration, preoccupation with grandiose fantasies concerning the self, and disturbances in interpersonal relationships, usually involving the exploitation of others and a lack of empathy.

narcissistic personality disorder

Autophilia, narcism, narcissism, self-centeredness, self-love Psychiatry A condition characterized by '…a pervasive pattern of grandiosity (in fantasy or behavior), need for admiration, and lack of empathy that begins in early adulthood…'; ±1% of the general population, and 2-16% of the clinical population has NPD. See Autoeroticism, Autosexual.
Narcissistic Personality Disorder > 5 of following criteria
1. Requires excessive admiration
.
2. Grandiose sense of self-importance; believes self to be superior
.
3. Preoccupied with fantasies of unlimited success, power, brilliance
.
4. Believes that he/she is special and should have only the best
.
5. Has sense of entitlement, ie deserves special favors or treatment
.
6. Exploits interpersonal relations, ie takes advantage of others
.
7. Lacks empathy and concern for others
.
8. Is envious of others or believes them to be envious of him/her
.
9. Displays arrogance
Modified from *Diagnostic & Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed, Am Psychiatric Asso, 1994
.

nar·cis·sis·tic per·son·al·i·ty dis·or·der

(nahr-si-sistik pĕr-sŏ-nali-tē dis-ōrdĕr)
Pervasive pattern in adulthood of self-centeredness, self-importance, lack of empathy, sense of entitlement, and viewing others largely as objects to meet one's needs, manifested in a variety of contexts.
Compare: autosynnoia
References in periodicals archive ?
His letter, surprisingly, has been taken at face value by the media and is almost being relegated to a footnote to this shameful scandal but a careful reading of it reveals the pathological narcissism of the man whose contrition is an artful construct.
Understanding and treating pathological narcissism.
Psychotherapists from the US, Canada, Europe, and Australia address the history of narcissism; its features, including interpersonal problems, affect regulation and mentalization, intrapsychic conflicts and defenses, suicide risk, and sex and race-ethnic differences in co-occurring disorders; diagnosis, subtypes, and assessment using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Psychodynamic Diagnostic Manual, and Pathological Narcissism Inventory; and treatment considerations, including countertransference issues, maintaining boundaries, transference-focused psychotherapy, Kohut's self psychology approach, short-term dynamic psychotherapy, schema therapy, and cognitive behavioral perspectives.
Pathological narcissism and the depressive temperament.
Empirical studies have supported clinical observations that pathological narcissism characteristics can be expressed in temporary traits or in stable, enduring personality disorder manifested as: grandiosity (the most distinguishing and discriminating evidence-based criterion), vulnerable and fluctuating self-esteem, strong reactions to perceived challenges or threats to self-esteem, self-enhancing interpersonal behavior, self-serving interpersonal behavior, interpersonal aggression and control, fluctuating or impaired empathic ability, and exceptionally high or perfectionist ideals and standards (Ronningstam 2009).
Cultural historian, Christopher Lasch (1932-1994) originally posited that narcissism and individualism were related through exploring the roots and ramifications of pathological narcissism in the United States' culture using psychological, cultural, artistic, and historical synthesis (Lasch 1979).
Medical intervention for the purpose of enhancement would tend to foster, instead, pathological narcissism, social injustice, and reduced moral accountability.
Parenthetically, institutional disregard of patients' personal liberty can promote defensive behaviors that might be diagnostically linked to pathological narcissism.
Pathological narcissism and narcissistic personality disorder.
Narcissistic personality disorder and pathological narcissism.
This could be seen in all the work by women--among them Angela Bulloch, Janine Antoni, Sylvie Fleury, and Smith, as well as in the surprising video by Cheryl Donegan--but it was also revealed in the pathological narcissism of Sean Landers and in the provocative sarcasm of Carsten Holler, both of whom are men.
His insights include Osama's dark epiphany as prototype of Islamist leaders' pathological narcissism, and Osama and company's apocalyptic scenarios and rebellious group martyrdom in terror cults.