pathognomonic

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pathognomonic

 [path″og-no-mon´ik]
specifically distinctive or characteristic of a disease or pathologic condition; denoting a sign or symptom on which a diagnosis can be made.

path·og·no·mon·ic

(path'og-nō-mon'ik),
Characteristic or indicative of a disease; denoting especially one or more typical symptoms, findings, or pattern of abnormalities specific for a given disease and not found in any other condition.
[see pathognomy]

pathognomonic

/pa·thog·no·mon·ic/ (path″ug-no-mon´ik) specifically distinctive or characteristic of a disease or pathologic condition; denoting a sign or symptom on which a diagnosis can be made.

pathognomonic

(pə-thŏg′nə-mŏn′ĭk, păth′əg-nō-)
adj.
Specific to a certain disease or condition, as a symptom or finding on physical examination.

pathognomonic

[pəthog′nəmon′ik]
Etymology: Gk, pathos + gnomon, index
(of a sign or symptom) specific to a disease or condition, such as Koplik's spots on the buccal and lingual mucosa, which are indicative of measles.

pathognomonic

Medtalk adjective Referring to a distinctive sign, Sx, or characteristic of a disorder on which a diagnosis is made

path·og·no·mon·ic

(path'og-nō-mon'ik)
Denoting something characteristic or indicative of a disease; denoting especially one or more typical symptoms, findings, or patterns of abnormalities specific to a given disease and not found in any other condition.

pathognomonic

Of a symptom or physical sign that is so uniquely characteristic of a particular disease as to establish the diagnosis.

pathognomonic

characteristic symptoms of a disease

pathognomonic (paˈ·thg·nō·mänˑ·ik),

adj relating to characteristic symptoms of a disease that are generally used as the basis for making a diagnosis.

path·og·no·mon·ic

(path'og-nō-mon'ik)
Characteristic or indicative of a given disease; denoting especially one or more typical symp toms, findings, or pattern of abnormalities specific for a given disease and not any others.

pathognomonic, (pəthog´nəmon´ik),

adj relating to a sign or symptom unique to a disease or one that distinguishes it from other diseases.

pathognomonic

specifically distinctive or characteristic of a disease or pathological condition; denoting a sign or other indicant on which a diagnosis can be made.
References in periodicals archive ?
There is currently no pathognomic immunophenotype to define neoplasia.
Considering that signs and symptoms of Toscana virus meningitis are not pathognomic, this case highlights the need for rapid and specific diagnostic tools, such as PCR assays, to identify infections caused by Toscana virus and other neurotropic viral agents.
Possibly stimulated by his scientific method of comparative anatomy, which clarified for him the understanding of underlying structures (the regole or universal principles), he also drew potent pathognomic comparisons between man and beast (nos.
Siegel (1995) reviewed the literature on memory development and found that many adults who experienced a nonclinical, normal development reported that they did not recall details from childhood: "Clinical implications of these findings are that therapists should not overzealously interpret lack of recall as a pathognomic indicator of 'repressed' trauma.
Pathognomic signs are rare curiosities; all other symptoms and signs float well out of the control of doctor and patient.
Therefore damage to any striated muscle will elevate CK-MB, although such elevations are not pathognomic of acute MI unless the percentage of MB activity is simultaneously increased.
There are no pathognomic radiological features of ameloblastoma, but radiographs may show a well-defined radiolucent lesion with scalloped margins which may be unilocular or multilocular ('soap bubble' appearance).
The study included 53 cases that involved the results of tissue analysis (19 autopsies and 34 biopsies), 44 that involved definitive results of laboratory tests or x-rays, and 3 that involved the analysis of pathognomic clinical findings.
7) The combination of calcinosis and acroosteolysis, as seen in Figure 2, is considered to be pathognomic for scleroderma.