paternal age effect

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paternal age effect

The effect that increased paternal age has on the incidence of genetic disease.

Conditions with paternal age effect
Achondroplasia, acrodysplasia, Klinefelter syndrome, Marfan syndrome. Paternal chromosomal defects occur in 2.6% of habitual abortions; most are translocations, occurring at a rate of 10-fold greater than normal. Increased maternal age is classically associated with chromosome defects in progeny, often in trisomies.
References in periodicals archive ?
20,21 Of the participants, 52% thought "Advanced paternal age is one of the aetiologic factors for ASD".
Between 1972 and 2015, the researchers found, the average paternal age at the time of an American child's birth grew from 27.
We have known for a while about the negative consequences of advanced paternal age, but now we have shown that these children may also go on to have better educational and career prospects.
These findings may offer insights into how paternal age influences childrens risk of autism and schizophrenia, which was shown in earlier studies.
Patients with schizophrenia share some risk factors with patients with progeria, including high paternal age, prenatal stress, prenatal famine, low birth weight, and premature cognitive decline.
While previous research has established the association between older paternal age and autism spectrum disorders (ASD), there have been significant differences between studies, as well as a lack of definitive information on whether paternal and maternal ages are independent risk factors.
Likewise, 123 missing data on paternal age were excluded in the adjusted analyses for cryptorchidism.
Edwards and Roff examined the relationship between paternal age and sperm mutation.
Relevant data including age, sex, maternal age, paternal age, consanguinity, antenatal risk factors, similar family history and external anomalies detected were entered in the preformed proforma.
A higher percentage of spontaneous mutations in some genetic disorders are paternal origin, [5] and this should be deduced in an association between paternal age and inherited diseases.
In order to analyze the relationship between parental age, we divided the samples into five age groups (<25, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, ≥40 years) according to maternal and paternal age.
It's time we took seriously the issue of paternal age and its effect on the next generation.