passive-aggressive behavior

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pas·sive-ag·gres·sive be·hav·ior

apparently compliant behavior, with intrinsic obstructive or stubborn qualities, to cover deeply felt aggressive feelings that cannot be more directly expressed.

pas·sive-ag·gres·sive be·ha·vi·or

(pasiv-ă-gresiv bĕ-hāvyŏr)
Apparently compliant behavior, with intrinsic obstructive or stubborn qualities, to cover deeply held aggressive feelings that cannot be more directly expressed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another individual at the same company was passive aggressive in other ways.
A typical scenario demonstrating the passive aggressive personality type would be, for example, a wife who is supposed to come home at 6pm to go with her husband to visit his family.
In their new Kindle book, “Escaping the Sexless Marriage: A Practical Manual to Bring Back Intimacy and Trust into a Passive Aggressive Marriage," the relationship experts at Creative Conflict Resolutions, Inc bring a wealth of information about the causes of this behavior, and explain what can be done to restore a more satisfactory connection between the partners.
He's passive aggressive, totally controlling of his blonde wife, and will end any argument over cereal like Jack Nicholson in The Shining.
Passive aggressive updates and self-promotion came in a close second to that at 24 and 22 percent can't stand rate respectively.
The only difference I can see is that it is more subversive--starting rumours, antagonising, or passive aggressive behaviour.
The wide-eyed pilgrim is then given a passive aggressive dressing down by Lennon.
THE STILLS: Changes Are No Good (679) , THE HONEYMOON: Passive Aggressive EP (BMG) , FRANZ FERDINAND: Matinee (Domino)
Since beginning their journey--which has lasted over 38 years--into understanding passive-aggressive children, the authors have led over 50 seminars and collected over 1200 personal testimonies of passive aggressive behavior at home and in schools across the nation.
Moreover, researchers suggest that the measuring of violent acts is vastly understated in that the figures do not reflect verbal, indirect, and passive aggressive behaviors which are more pervasive (Baron & Neuman, 1996; Elliot & Jarrett, 1994; Harlan, 1995).
Passive aggressive attitudes contributed appreciably to explaining a range of sexual behaviors.

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