Paramoeba

Paramoeba

(par'ă-mē'bă),
Former name for Entamoeba.

Paramoeba

/Par·amoe·ba/ (par″ah-me´bah) a genus of parasitic or free-living ameboid protozoa.

Paramoeba

cause of amebic gill disease in salmonids.
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References in periodicals archive ?
droebachiensis by the protozoan Paramoeba invadens at high water temperatures in summer causes mass mortality, also resulting in kelp reforestation (Johnson & Mann 1988).
Many theories about the cause have been put forth, including pesticide applications, effluents from sewage treatment plants, dredging sediment, ecological and climatic factors, and infection by a parasitic paramoeba species.
A paramoeba infection is suspected but the predisposing factors are unknown (Van Patten and French 2000).
They found a Paramoeba parasite (a single-celled, microscopic organism that lives off other creatures) swimming in hundreds of samples taken from dead lobsters.
A protozoan parasite, Paramoeba invadens, was recommended and tested in the laboratory as a biological control agent because natural outbreaks of this ameba greatly reduced sea urchin abundance (Jones 1985, Jones and Scheibling 1985, Miller 1985).
The lobster population in western Long Island Sound has been decimated in recent years, and a variety of factors have been implicated, including elevated temperatures, anoxia, paramoeba infestation, and exposure to pesticides and other chemicals entering the marine environment (Long Island Sound Lobster Health Symposium, 2003).
2003), as well as those related to protozoan parasites such as Paramoeba (Mullen et al.
KEY WORDS: lobster, mortality, Long Island Sound, disease, pesticides, paramoeba, temperature, Homarus americanus
Whereas the exact cause or causes of the mortality are still not precisely known, dead and dying lobsters in the initial phase of the die-off were diagnosed with infections with paramoeba, a newly recognized disease condition of lobsters.
2004) have reported that infection of a parasitic paramoeba was the primary cause of the mass mortality of American lobsters in western Long Island Sound (New York and Connecticut, USA) in 1999.
The parasome, sometimes referred to as a "secondary nucleus" because it contains DNA and superficially resembles the authentic cell nucleus (Grell 1961, Grell & Benwitz 1970, Perkins & Castagna 1971), has been considered diagnostic for the genera Paramoeba and Neoparamoeba (Page 1987).