Paracelsus

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Par·a·cel·sus

(par-ĕ-sel'sus),
Aureolus Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim, Swiss physician, 1493-1541. See: paracelsian method.

Paracelsus

(păr′ə-sĕl′səs) Originally Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim. 1493-1541.
German-Swiss alchemist and physician. He held that illness was the result of external agents attacking the body rather than imbalances within the body and advocated the use of chemicals against disease-causing agents.

Paracelsus

(păr-ă-sĕl′sŭs)
[Philippus Aureolus Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim, 1493–1541]
Swiss alchemist and physician who introduced several chemicals (lead, sulfur, iron, and arsenic) into pharmaceutical chemistry.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, Hester's collection of Paracelsian remedies seem to display similar attitudes to menstruation and menstrual blood as more Galenic tracts do, viewing both as dangerous in too great or too little a quantity.
Soukup, a structural chemist who has analyzed archaeological remains of laboratory waste pits in Lower Austria, adds to our understanding of the links between mining and alchemy and of the importance of patronage in supporting such laboratories for practical purposes, the latter theme echoed in Didier Kahn's analysis of King Henry IV of France's patronage of alchemy and Paracelsian medicine.
In the context of Paracelsian healing, the similitude of music and lovesickness is an advantage, rendering erotic melancholy particularly susceptible to musical treatment: for Gohory, as we will see, musical performances inflame desire, but music also potentially transforms desire's most damaging effects by channelling it towards spiritual goals.
In light of the Paracelsian principle of healing through likeness, Gohory's handling of the scene in which Arlanges first recognizes Agesilan's lovesickness--triggered by Diane's portrait alone at this stage in the narrative--is significant.
123) Henri's urgency is striking and might be read as in part arising from belief in song as both erotic cure and potential charm--a belief consonant with Henri's well-known confidence in occult and Paracelsian remedies generally.
This book is a welcome addition to Allen Debus' studies of the Paracelsian tradition in early modern Europe.