Pappenheimer bodies

Pap·pen·hei·mer bod·ies

(pahp'ĕn-hī-mĕr),
phagosomes, containing ferruginous granules, found in red blood cells in certain diseases (for example, sideroblastic anemia, hemolytic anemia, and sickle cell disease); may contribute to spurious platelet counts by electrooptic counters.

Pappenheimer bodies

Etymology: A.M. Pappenheimer, U.S. pathologist, 1878-1955
red blood cell inclusions composed of ferric iron. On Prussian blue iron stain preparations, they appear as multiple dark blood irregular granules at the periphery of the cell. On Wright stain blood films they appear as pale blue clusters. Also called siderotic granules.

Pap·pen·hei·mer bod·ies

(pahp'ĕn-hī-mer bod'ēz)
Phagosomes, containing ferruginous granules, found in red blood cells in some diseases (e.g., sideroblastic anemia, hemolytic anemia, and sickle cell disease).

Pappenheimer,

Alwin M., U.S. pathologist, 1878-1955.
Pappenheimer bodies - phagosomes containing ferruginous granules, found in red blood cells in diseases such as sideroblastic anemia, hemolytic anemia and sickle cell disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Section II discusses the specifics of grading individual red blood cell abnormalities and defines a grading system described in words and images for anisocytosis, poikilocytosis, microcytosis, macrocytosis, hypochromia, polychromasia, blister cells, target cells, teardrop cells, schistocytes, sickle cells, spherocytes, acanthocytes, echinocytes, elliptocytes, stomatocytes, Howell-Jolly bodies, basophilic stippling, Pappenheimer bodies, rouleaux, and agglutination.
The instrument would not detect any red-cell inclusions, such as Howell-Jolly bodies, basophilic stippling, and Pappenheimer bodies.
We describe a patient with a history of chronic microcytic anemia with peripheral schistocytosis, polychromasia, and Pappenheimer bodies, treated empirically with chronic iron supplementation.