Paneth cells


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Related to Paneth cells: Peyer's patches

Paneth cells

(pah′nĕt)
[Josef Paneth, Ger. physician, 1857–1890]
Large secretory cells containing coarse granules, found at the blind end of the crypts of Lieberkühn (the intestinal glands). They secrete lysozyme.

Paneth cells

the cells that occur at the bases of the CRYPTS OF LIEBERKUHN. They persist for only about two weeks and then disintegrate. It is thought that they remove ions of heavy metal and secrete AMINO ACIDS and LYSOZYME - an antibacterial enzyme which controls the number of bacteria in the gut. It is also possible that they secrete enzymes such as peptidases and lipases.
References in periodicals archive ?
Light and electron microscopic morphology of Paneth cells in the sheep small intestine.
18) Although chronicity including crypt architectural distortion and Paneth cells in the left colon may be seen in mycophenolate mofetil-associated colitis, the additional pattern of injury, such as crypt apoptosis and isolated crypt damage, may be conspicuous compared with IBD.
Paneth cells control two signaling pathways, known as Notch and Wnt, which coordinate cell proliferation, especially during embryonic development.
For years, scientists have amassed a case that Paneth cells safeguard stem cells.
Paneth cells release granules into the lumen of the crypts of Lieberkuhn in the small intestine where their component proteins participate in mucosal immunity (7).
12) Intestinal AIS is defined by the presence of variable number of goblet cells and less commonly, neuroendocrine and Paneth cells.
In the right colon, Paneth cells are a normal constituent, and in children they may be even be present in the normal transverse colon.
Enterocytes: Presence versus loss of brush border, shape and height of enterocytes, intracytoplasmic vacuolation, presence of goblet cells or Paneth cells, denudation or damage of the surface enterocytes.
Although the mechanisms are not entirely clear, glucocorticoids appear to promote the growth of Paneth cells at the expense of goblet cells at the base of the intestinal crypts.
An absorptive brush border is evident, and Paneth cells may or may not be present.
One may also identify absorptive cells, Paneth cells, and endocrine cells in both the crypt and surface epithelium (Figure 1, D).
Paneth cells and endocrine cells can be seen in 20% of pyloric gland adenomas.